Margarett Stewart

F, b. 3 May 1799, d. 21 May 1869
  • Last Edited: 13 Oct 2019

Family: Larkin Strickland b. 1 May 1799, d. 11 May 1848

Citations

  1. [S1850] 1850, Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: Beat 8, Randolph, Alabama; Roll: M432_14; Page: 342A; Image: 124

    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Margaret Strickland      45
    Mary Strickland      24
    John Strickland      22
    David Strickland      20
    William Strickland      18
    Madison Strickland      16
    Morgan Strickland      14 (Illegible, must have been Margery Margaret)
    Mc Lemore Strickland      12 (no clue on this one)
    Larkin Strickland      11
    Jefferson Strickland      10
    Henry Strickland      8.
  2. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesy of Danny Haralson, who copied the photo in the possession of Margaret Milford of Lanett, AL.
  3. [S1860] 1860, Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Southern Division, Randolph, Alabama; Roll: M653_22; Page: 678; Family History Library Film: 803022

    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Margaret Strickland      61
    David L Strickland      27
    Madison Strickland      18
    Jefferson Strickland      18
    Margaret M Strickland      20
    Henry A Strickland      16
    George W Strickland      22.
  4. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Larkin Strickland

M, b. 1 May 1799, d. 11 May 1848
  • Last Edited: 19 Oct 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: 1 May 1799; Abbeville, South Carolina
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 13 March 1821; Jackson Co., Georgia; Bride=Margarett Stewart
  • 1830 Census*: 1 June 1830; Captain Stewart's District, Troup Co., Georgia1
  • 1840 Census*: 1 June 1840; 800 District, Troup Co., Georgia2
  • (Deceased) Death*: 11 May 1848; Randolph Co., Alabama
  • (Father) Photographed: say 1860; from Lew Griffin, 11 October 2019:
    The elder Larkin died in 1848 at the age of 49. The fellow in the photo looks younger than that to me, suggesting the photo was earlier than 1848 if it were the Larkin born in 1799. The daguerreotype was invented in 1839, as I recall. There were other processes before that. I just not sure what would have been available in rural Alabama at that early date. If you have any thoughts on the age of the photo, etc., I’d be interested to hear. Does it look like a tintype?

    From Terrence White, current owner of the original photo, 12 Oct 2019:

    As for the photo of "Larkin Strickland" ... I had seriously wondered the same thing myself. It is clearly a tintype, and not an earlier daguerreotype. How do I know this for certain? Well, it completely lacks the noticeable, obvious silvery sheen that all daguerreotypes must have, in order to be that medium (since the image was exposed directly onto a plate of silver-plated copper.) It looks exactly like every other dull brown tintype I've ever seen. It is also definitely not an "ambrotype" (also common in that early period) because they were made on plates of glass. I have two of those. One from my Mom's family, and one that's unidentified and not from any part of my ancestry at all.

    The Wikipedia article about "tintypes" which I just now consulted says that the process was first described scientifically in 1853, and first patented in the United States in 1856. So that should settle the matter. (Even though this photograph IS placed in the photo album exactly opposite the tintype of Margaret "Peggy" Stewart, the elder Larkin's wife.); Principal=Larkin McEwen Strickland3
    unknown Strickland, possibly Larkin M. Strickland
    another copy of this tintype, from the 1980's
  • Biography*: 16 October 2019; Larkin Strickland was born in 1799 probably in Abbeville District, SC.

    By 1807 his family is thought to have been in Jackson Co. GA. He married there in 1821 to Margarett Stewart, called Peggy, daughter of James Stewart and Margery McEwen. Larkin won land in the 1821 Land Lottery, Lot 65 in the 11th District of Dooly Co. GA. He appears on the 1821 Tax Digest of Jackson Co., and again in 1823 and 1824. He owned no land during this period, but paid his poll tax and was also agent for the orphans of Julius Strickland as well as for Nancy Strickland. These were his mother and brothers.

    Larkin's whereabouts after 1824 are unknown, but by 1830 he was in Troup Co. GA near the now defunct community of Antioch, in the NW corner of the county.

    He is mentioned in 1834 in a deed as a resident of Heard Co. GA. Calvin Strickland sold him a lot in Cherokee Co. that year, which he later resold to his wife's brother (Cherokee Co. DB).

    Between 1835 and 1845 Larkin bought and sold several land lots in Troup Co. He was on the 1840 census there.

    Based on the births of his children, he moved to Randolph Co. AL in about 1843, but only a short distance from his residence in Troup Co. He was close enough, in fact, to continue to be a patient of Dr. Henry H. Cary of Antioch. Horatio G. and James P. Strickland are also mentioned in the doctor's surviving journals (Pine Log and Greek Revival by W.H. Davidson).

    Larkin died in Randolph Co. in 1848, killed by a log which rolled over him while he was clearing land.

    Harrison Latimer Anderson of Marietta, GA, had his family Bible, and one of his sons is now said to have it.

    An old photo album including a photo of a supposed "Larkin Strickland" is currently (2019) in the possession of Terrence James White, a descendant of Elijah Davis, husband of Mary (Strickland) Davis. Terry lives in the Atlanta area. Terry tells me the photo is clearly a tintype. Since tintypes were not available prior to 1859, and since Larkin Strickland Sr. died in 1848, the photo might possibly be Larkin Sr.'s son, Larkin M. Strickland, who was born in 1837. Or it might be one of Larkin's other sons. But it is definitely not this Larkin, who died in 1848.4

Family: Margarett Stewart b. 3 May 1799, d. 21 May 1869

Citations

  1. [S1830] 1830, Census, 1830; Census Place: Capt Stewarts District, Troup, Georgia; Series: M19; Roll: 21; Page: 49; Family History Library Film: 0007041

    Name:      Larkin Strickland
    Home in 1830 (City, County, State):      Capt Stewarts District, Troup, Georgia
    Free White Persons - Males - Under 5:      1
    Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9:      2
    Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - Under 5:      2
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39:      1
    Free White Persons - Under 20:      6
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49:      2
    Total Free White Persons:      8
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):      8.
  2. [S1840] 1840, Census, Year: 1840; Census Place: District 800, Troup, Georgia; Page: 365; Family History Library Film: 0007047

    Name:      Larkin Strickland
    Home in 1840 (City, County, State):      District 800, Troup, Georgia
    Free White Persons - Males - Under 5:      2
    Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9:      3
    Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19:      2
    Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - Under 5:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14:      2
    Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49:      1
    Persons Employed in Agriculture:      4
    No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write:      1
    Free White Persons - Under 20:      12
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49:      2
    Total Free White Persons:      14
    Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves:      14.
  3. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    the 1980's version is courtesy of Danny Haralson, who copied the photo in the possession of Margaret Milford of Lanett, AL. The 2019 version courtesy of Terrence White, the current (2019) owner of the photo album.
  4. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Henry Ansel Strickland

M, b. 17 March 1844, d. 17 August 1914
  • Last Edited: 7 Sep 2018

Family: Julia Ann Halsey b. 15 Oct 1846, d. 21 Sep 1887

Citations

  1. [S1850] 1850, Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: Beat 8, Randolph, Alabama; Roll: M432_14; Page: 342A; Image: 124

    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Margaret Strickland      45
    Mary Strickland      24
    John Strickland      22
    David Strickland      20
    William Strickland      18
    Madison Strickland      16
    Morgan Strickland      14 (Illegible, must have been Margery Margaret)
    Mc Lemore Strickland      12 (no clue on this one)
    Larkin Strickland      11
    Jefferson Strickland      10
    Henry Strickland      8.
  2. [S1860] 1860, Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Southern Division, Randolph, Alabama; Roll: M653_22; Page: 678; Family History Library Film: 803022

    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Margaret Strickland      61
    David L Strickland      27
    Madison Strickland      18
    Jefferson Strickland      18
    Margaret M Strickland      20
    Henry A Strickland      16
    George W Strickland      22.
  3. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesy of James Maurice Griffin of Memphis, TN (deceased).
  4. [S1870] 1870, Census, Bacon Level, Randolph, Alabama; Roll: M593_37; Page: 556A; Image: 660; Family History Library Film: 545536.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Henry Strickland     28
    Julia Strickland     25
    Lanora Strickland     1
    Dora Strickland     1.
  5. [S1880] 1880 Census, Hickory Flat, Chambers, Alabama; Roll: 5; Family History Film: 1254005; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 016; Image: 0233.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Henry Strickland     36
    Julia Strickland     34
    Lenarah Strickland     11
    Derah Strickland     11
    Ollie Strickland     8
    Julias Strickland     4
    Minnie Strickland     2.
  6. [S1900] 1900 Federal census, , Hickory Flat, Chambers, Alabama; Roll: 6; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 0001; FHL microfilm: 1240006.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Henry A Strickland     56
    Lanora D Strickland     30
    Henry L Strickland     19
    Julia A Strickland     17
    Ansell R Strickland     14
    Greene     24.
  7. [S1910] 1910 Federal Census, , Hickory Flat, Chambers, Alabama; Roll: T624_5; Page: 8B; Enumeration District: 0014; ; FHL microfilm: 1374018.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Henry A Strickland     65
    Lanorah Strickland     40
    Julia A Strickland     27
    Ansell R Strickland     25.
  8. [S3] FindAGrave.com, .
    Find A Grave Memorial 42055114.

Julia Ann Halsey

F, b. 15 October 1846, d. 21 September 1887
  • Last Edited: 30 Nov 2017

Family: Henry Ansel Strickland b. 17 Mar 1844, d. 17 Aug 1914

Citations

  1. [S1870] 1870, Census, Bacon Level, Randolph, Alabama; Roll: M593_37; Page: 556A; Image: 660; Family History Library Film: 545536.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Henry Strickland     28
    Julia Strickland     25
    Lanora Strickland     1
    Dora Strickland     1.
  2. [S1880] 1880 Census, Hickory Flat, Chambers, Alabama; Roll: 5; Family History Film: 1254005; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 016; Image: 0233.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Henry Strickland     36
    Julia Strickland     34
    Lenarah Strickland     11
    Derah Strickland     11
    Ollie Strickland     8
    Julias Strickland     4
    Minnie Strickland     2.

Lewis Halsey

M, b. 22 April 1816, d. 7 November 1878
  • Last Edited: 5 May 2018
  • Biography*: Lewis Halsey was the son of Benjamin L. Halsey. He was born in 1816 in Jefferson Co. GA. His family lived in Monroe Co. GA before moving to Chambers Co. AL about 1838. In 1840 Lewis bought 160 acres in Chambers, the NE fourth of Section 9, in R28E, T24N (DB 3-247). This was about a mile east of Standing Rock, AL. In 1844 he married Sarah Brooks Cohron, and the couple had seven children. The two sons apparently died in the Civil War. Lewis died in Chambers Co. in 1878, his wife Sarah in 1895.
  • Name Variation: Louis Hallsey
  • (Child) Birth*: 22 April 1816; Jefferson Co., Georgia
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 11 December 1844; Chambers Co., Alabama; Bride=Sarah Brooks Cohron
  • (Deceased) Death*: 7 November 1878; Chambers Co., Alabama

Family: Sarah Brooks Cohron b. 18 Oct 1822, d. 29 Jun 1895

Sarah Brooks Cohron

F, b. 18 October 1822, d. 29 June 1895
  • Last Edited: 12 Feb 2019
  • Name Variation: Sarah Brooks Choron
  • Name Variation: Sarah Brooks Charon
  • (Child) Birth*: 18 October 1822; Georgia
  • (Bride) Marriage*: 11 December 1844; Chambers Co., Alabama; Groom=Lewis Halsey
  • Married Name: 11 December 1844; Halsey
  • Photographed*: say 1855; Chambers Co., Alabama1
    Sarah Brooks Cohron
  • (Deceased) Death*: 29 June 1895; Chambers Co., Alabama
  • Biography*: 12 February 2019; Sarah Brooks Cohron was probably born in Wilkes County, Georgia in 1822, the daughter of John Cohron, who was last found in Troup County, Georgia in 1840.

    In 1844 she married Lewis Halsey in Chambers County AL, and died there 51 years later, in 1895. Both she and Lewis, who died in 1878, are buried in Standing Rock.

    According to family tradition, Sarah was of French descent, but her paternal line was Scots-Irish and Quaker. Any French ancestry she may have had, if any, has not yet been found.

    The correct spelling of her last name varies. The correct spelling is Cohron. Whatever the spelling, it was pronounced "Core-un" with the emphasis on "Core."

    According to an old letter, Sarah had a sister, Nancy, who married a Hammond, and a brother, John.

    Nancy was the Nancy Cochran who married Augustus Hammond in 1846 in Chambers County. Nancy was born in 1827, but whether in Alabama or Georgia is not clear. The 1860 and 1900 censuses say Alabama, and the 1850 census says Georgia. Georgia is probably correct. Nancy died in 1907, Augustus in 1910, both are buried in Emory Chapel Cemetery in Chambers County.

    John was the John W. Cohron who married Ophelia E. Strozier in 1852 in Chambers County. The couple was on the 1860 census in Chambers County, John W. Cohorn was aged 25, born in Alabama.

    Sarah's place of birth varies on the census, as does her age. Her birthplace was listed as Alabama on the 1850 census but as Georgia on later censuses. Her age was listed as 32 in 1850, 36 in 1860, 48 in 1870, and 54 in 1880. This places her birth between 1818 and 1826. With the dates or places of birth of Sarah and Nancy in doubt, it is difficult to determine when Sarah's family first moved to Alabama from Georgia.

    The Cohrons left few records in Chambers County. A John Cohran was on the 1840 census there, a young man in his late twenties with a wife and four small children, two sons under age five, and two daughters between five and ten. (In 1840 Sarah and Nancy were teenagers and John W. was five.)

    In 1843 Julia Cohon married Charles H. B. Harris in Chambers County. She was underage, and John Cohon gave his consent. The couple was married by Edmund Jackson, a Baptist minister. Judging from the names of the couples Jackson married, he was probably one of the first ministers of Mt. Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church. The church is about six miles west of Standing Rock, AL, and was founded in 1837.

    In 1844 Sarah Charon married Lewis Halsey, with Edmund Jackson as the minister.

    In 1846 Nancy Cochran married Augustus Hammond.

    In 1847 a Mrs. Corhorn was listed in a record of school patrons around Fredonia in Chambers County. Fredonia is about six miles south of Mt. Pisgah Church.

    In 1852 John W. Cohron married Ophelia Strozier. John Cohran, who had four children in 1840, does not appear on the 1850 census in Chambers County.2

Family: Lewis Halsey b. 22 Apr 1816, d. 7 Nov 1878

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    copy of original in the possession of Julie (Griffin) Cooper. It was given to Julie by her uncle, James Maurice Griffin.

    This photo was shared with me by Julia (Judge) Griffin, wife of Joseph Wyeth Griffin. Her daughter, Julie (Griffin) Cooper, has the original, which was given to her by my uncle, James Maurice Griffin. The photo originally belonged to Minnie Dallas Strickland Griffin, wife of James Olin Griffin. Sarah Cohron Halsey was her grandmother.
  2. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Julius Strickland

M, b. say 1765, d. circa 1816
  • Last Edited: 23 Apr 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: say 1765; North Carolina1
  • (Groom) Marriage*: say 1798; Abbeville, South Carolina; Bride=Nancy Mullins
  • 1800 Census*: 4 August 1800; Abbeville District, South Carolina2
  • (Deceased) Death*: circa 1816; Jackson Co., Georgia
  • Biography*: 23 April 2019; Jacob Strickland appears to have been the grandfather of Julius Strickland. Other researchers think Julius was the son of a William Abner Strickland, son of Jacob. Jacob's extensive will, which even mentions several grandchildren, does not mention a son William, Abner, or William Abner.

    However, descendants of the various sons of Julius Strickland have autosomal DNA matches to descendants of the various sons of Jacob, so one of Jacob's sons must have been the father or grandfather of Julius.

    Therefore it seems likely that Jacob left at least one son out of his will. That son's name, Abner, or William Abner, is speculation, as the father of Julius has never been proven.

    This speculation is all based on the AncestryDNA test, and the Thrulines feature of that test. Many paper records that might have aided research on this family have been lost, both in Wake County, NC, and in Abbeville District, SC.; Referenced Name=Jacob Strickland3

Family: Nancy Mullins b. c 1775, d. a 1 Jun 1840

Citations

  1. [S1] His birth date is based on the idea that he served in the Rev. War. Otherwise, it is more likely around 1775.
  2. [S1800] 1800 Census, Year: 1800; Census Place: Abbeville, South Carolina; Series: M32; Roll: 47; Page: 35; Image: 74; Family History Library Film: 181422

    Name:      Julius Stricklin
    Home in 1800 (City, County, State):      Abbeville, South Carolina
    Free White Persons - Males - Under 10:      2
    Free White Persons - Males - 26 thru 44:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 45 and over:      1
    Number of Household Members Under 16:      2
    Number of Household Members Over 25:      2
    Number of Household Members:      5

    (2nd door away was Josiah Stricklin).
  3. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Nancy Mullins

F, b. circa 1775, d. after 1 June 1840
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1775; North Carolina
  • Married Name: circa 1796; Strickland
  • (Bride) Marriage*: say 1798; Abbeville, South Carolina; Groom=Julius Strickland
  • (head of family) 1820 Census*: 1 June 1820; Jackson Co., Georgia1
  • (head of family) 1840 Census*: 1 June 1840; Cobb Co., Georgia2
  • (Deceased) Death*: after 1 June 1840; Cobb Co., Georgia
  • Research Note: 6 October 2004; from Marlene Wall:
    Julius Strickland married Mourning Mullins sister I believe and so does Bea Clark a descendant. I believe their father was John Mullins, II, brother of Bud Mullins. Bud Mullins was buried near my home in Marietta over in Paulding County, Georgia.3
  • Research Note*: 16 April 2019; from Lew Griffin:
    Nancy's maiden name may have been Mullins. She may have been a sister or other relative of Bud Mullins. She is not mentioned in the will of Bud Mullins father, John, and she was probably not the same person as Chaney Mullins, as some have assumed.

    In any case, she does seem to fit somehow into this Mullins family, based on autosomal DNA evidence from the AncestryDNA test.

    Bud Mullins was living near Nancy in 1840 Cobb County, GA. Between the two was Andrew Mullins, who was possibly Bud's son. Nancy's son Loderick lived adjacent to her.

    As of April 2019, this writer is getting several Mullins matches to Nancy on AncestryDNA, and the Thrulines feature. Further research is needed on these matches.4

Family: Julius Strickland b. s 1765, d. c 1816

Citations

  1. [S1820] 1820 Census, page 303: 4 males under 10, 1 male 10-16, one male 16-18, two males 16-25, one female over 45.
  2. [S1840] 1840, Census, Year: 1840; Census Place: District 846, Cobb, Georgia; Page: 258; Family History Library Film: 0007042

    Name:      Nancy Stricklin
    Home in 1840 (City, County, State):      District 846, Cobb , Georgia
    Free White Persons - Females - 80 thru 89:      1
    No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write:      1
    Total Free White Persons:      1
    Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves:      1.
  3. [S235] Lois Marlene (Meacham) Wall (Mrs. John Henry Wall Jr.) e-mail, e-mail address, 1999 - 2009,.
  4. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

James Stewart

M, b. 16 April 1765, d. 6 February 1854
  • Last Edited: 25 Feb 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: 16 April 1765; Rowan Co., North Carolina
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 25 March 1794; Bride=Margery McEwen
  • (Deceased) Death*: 6 February 1854; Heard Co., Georgia
  • (Witness) Research Note: April 2009; Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 12:12 PM

    .... Would this Capt Sloan, killed at the Battle of Ramseur's Mill on 20 June 1780, be the father of Anne Sloane, wife of David Mitchell Stewart? If this is correct, then both James Stewart born 1723 and James Stewart born 1765 were fighting in the Rev. War under General Rutherford and Capt Sloan. The only difference was General Rutherford ordered the Militia of Salisbury District, Rowan, Mecklenburg & Tyron Counties for service of a tour for three months. This would explain why James Stewart born 1723 was only in one battle (see paragraph highlighted in blue). This would also mean that William Stewart, son of James born 1723, was in this same battle, since it was stated he was in the same battle with his father and was wounded.This is very interesting and would love to have your comments.
    Lois: Look at the copy of the Rev. War records that you have and see if it states that James Stewart born 1765 served under Gen. Rutherford and Capt Sloan and also see if it states when he entered the war. The information I have says that he entered service in April 1781 under Capt John Sloan's company which would not jive if Capt John Sloan died 20 June 1780.; Principal=James Stewart, Principal=William Stewart1
  • Research Note*: 14 January 2017;
    From: Lisa Crockett Richmond
    Sent: Saturday, January 14, 2017
    To: Lew Griffin

    Hi Lew,

    My grandmother, Hollis Awbrey Crockett, wanted me to tell you that she had this old, large rocking chair made with no bolts, screws or nails that was passed on to my grandfather, David Crockett, from his father, James Crockett. James always said the rocking chair was made forDavid [sic] Stewart because he was a big man. My aunt Susan Crockett Jacks has it now.

    Just an interesting story...

    Happy New Year!
    Lisa

    Hi Lisa,
     That’s very interesting! I have a letter written in the 1930’s by one of the Stewart cousins, and she was discussing that old chair, and knew which Crockett had it then, and said it was made for James Stewart, Rev. War soldier, who was “a large man.” Maybe you meant to say James Stewart and said David by mistake. It is a very old chair! I’m glad to hear that it is still in the family some 80 years after that letter was written....
    Best,
    Lew
    ; Principal=Louisiana A. Stewart2
  • Biography*: 25 February 2019; James Stewart was "drafted to serve in the Revolutionary War in 1781, at sixteen years of age" according to his pension file. He served under General Griffith Rutherford, Colonel George Davison, and Captain John Sloan. "He was in no battles but was stationed frequently on the ferries to prevent or intercept the passage of the Tories." (Pension File S-32534)

    He is said to have lived in South Carolina before moving to Georgia, but where is unknown. In 1794 he married Margery (no surname mentioned), according to a family Bible record.

    He may have been the James Stewart with wife Margaret who was mentioned in an Athens, GA, church record in 1795. Margery is a nickname for Margaret.

    p. 10 Wilkes Co., Ga.: 10 Nov. 1794, JAMES STEWART & MARGARET, his wife, to Joseph Reynolds, all of said co., for £60, 200 acres in said co. (signed) James Stewart, Margeret Stewart. Wit: Richard Reynolds, Abner James. Plat: Joseph Reynolds' 200 acres, adj. Killough, Cathrine Felder, & vacant, N40W 26 1/2 ch., N50E 50 ch., S60E 13.25 ch., N40E 14.75 ch., S40E 21 1/2 ch., S50W 63.50 ch., N40W 6 1/2 ch., S50W 5 ch. Proved before John Lumpkin, J.P. Oglethorpe GA Deed Book B

    p. 129 12 Nov. 1796, Joseph Reynolds of Jackson Co., Ga., to Joseph Canterberry of Oglethorpe Co., Ga., for $13 0, 100 acres with plantation where Abner James now lives, is part of 200 acres on Troublesom branches of Long Creek waters in Oglethorpe Co., was granted by Gov. Geo. Mathews to JAMES STEWART, 1 Jan. 1788, & sold by him to Joseph Reynolds, adj. S. by James Brooks & Catharine Fielder, N. by James ... (signed) Joseph Reynolds. Wit: Pechey Bledsoe, J.P. Oglethorpe GA Deed Book B

    p. 156 2 Nov. 1798, Joseph Reynolds of Jackson Co., Ga., to Thomas Colley of Oglethorpe Co., for $175, in Oglethorpe Co. on branches of Troublesome of Long Creek, beg. hickory cor. on Samuel Hale, S50W to post oak cor. on Kellough's line, N50W 6 ch. 50 links to post oak cor. on Kellough's line, S50W 5 ch. to cor. hickory on Kellough, N40W 26 ch. 50 links to black oak cor. on Catherine Felder, on Felder N50E to new cor. hickory, on new dividing line between Joseph Reynolds & Abner James a S. course to beg., 100 acres, is part of 200 acres granted to JAMES STEWART in 1788, in fee simple. (signed) Joseph Reynolds. Wit: Joseph (x) Brooks, John (x) Williams. Proved 28 June 1799 before William Strother, J.P.

    In any case James was in Georgia by 1799, as his daughter Margaret was born there then. James and several of his brothers are said to appear in Jackson Co. tax records prior to 1810 (Gone to GA by William Stewart). Several of these brothers soon left for Tennessee, Kentucky, and Indiana, according to this source and the Stewart Clan Magazine. James was on the 1820 census in Jackson Co. GA. He is thought to have lived in Fayette Co. GA during the mid-1820's, and was probably the James Stewart, Revolutionary soldier, of Rozier's District there who won Lot 70 in the 22nd District of Lee Co., later Stewart Co., in the 1827 Land Lottery. By 1830 James was in Troup Co. GA, in Capt. Stewart's District. His wife Margery died there in 1841. James spent his last years with his son John in Heard Co. GA. He died there in 1854. James was a blacksmith by trade, and was said to have been a large man, weighing over 300 lbs.

    Jim B. Crockett, a descendant, was said to have had his chair, which was especially built for him. Jim Crockett was the son of Louisiana Stewart Crockett, who was the daughter of John Stewart. John had looked after James Stewart in his old age, and so is thought to have inherited his chair.

    The old chair is pictured below. An alternate account is that this particular chair belonged originally to John Stewart.3,4
    James Stewart chair
    James Stewart chair
    James Stewart chair

Family: Margery McEwen b. 27 Jul 1772, d. 21 Apr 1841

Citations

  1. [S400] Judy Griffin e-mail, e-mail address, Apr 2009,.
    merican Revolution...Battle of Ramseur’s Mill

    The Battle of Ramseur’s Mill
    June 20, 1780

    According to several historical accounts, Capt Patrick Knox was killed in the American Revolution at the "Battle of Ramsour's Mill," 20 June 1780, in Lincolnton, Lincoln Co, NC. In his book "Sketches of Western North Carolina" published 1877, (page 215), author C. L. Hunter states,

    "Of the Whig officers, Captains Falls, Knox, Dobson, Smith, Bowman, Sloan, and Armstrong were killed.... Captain Patrick Knox was mortally wounded in the thigh; an artery being severed, he very soon died from the resulting hemorrhage…Captains Hugh Torrance, David Caldwell, John Reid, all of Rowan, and Capt Smith of Mecklenburg, came out of the conflict unhurt."

    This indicates there were two Capt Smiths...one was killed and the other unhurt in the conflict. One was Captain William Smith according to William A. Graham’s account, the other Captain Smith, also of Mecklenburg, is unnamed, but I speculate this was “Smith” the brother of Mary, the widow of Captain Patrick Knox, and who is named in Patrick’s estate papers. This Captain Smith wa[s possibly David Smith who died in 1823, Mecklenburg Co, NC.

    William A. Graham, Major on Staff of Adjutant General of North Carolina, states in his 1904 account of "The Battle of Ramsaur's Mill" that

    "On the 18th [June, 1780], Major [David] Wilson, with sixty-five men, among whom were Captains Patrick Knox and William Smith, crossed the Catawba at Toole's Ford, about fourteen miles from Charlotte, near where Moore's Ferry was for many years and Allison's Ferry is now. The ford has been seldom used since 1865, and has been abandoned as a crossing for many years. It is three miles below Cowan's Ford."

    Major Grahams complete account is given below:

    THE BATTLE OF RAMSAUR'S MILL, June 20,1780
    By William A. Graham ,
    Major on Staff of Adjutant General of North Carolina

    Sir Henry Clinton, after the surrender of Charleston in May, 1780, regarded the Royal authority as restored in Georgia and South Carolina, and, leaving Lord Cornwallis in command with a force, which was regarded, with the anticipated re-inforcements from friends in upper South Carolina and North Carolina, as sufficient to subdue North Carolina, sailed with his main army to New York.

    Lord Cornwallis plan of campaign was to move with the main body of regulars by a central route through Charlotte and Salisbury, and to send a small force under a competent commander to his right to organize his friends in the upper Cape Fear section, and another force to his left to embody the adherents of Britain in upper South Carolina and in Tryon County; to re-inforce his main army and also to protect his outposts from the attacks of McDowell, Cleavland and others aided by the "over the mountain men," as those beyond the Blue Ridge were called. The crops of the previous year being consumed, he delayed his movement until that of 1780 could be harvested and threshed. The section around Ramsaur's Mill was then, as it is now, very fine for wheat. He sent

    Colonel John Moore into this country to inform the people that be was coming and would reward and protect the loyal, but would inflict dire punishment upon his opponents; for them to secure the wheat crop and be in readiness, but to make no organization until he should direct.

    The TORIES.

    Moore had gone from this section and joined the British army some time previous and had been made Lieutenant-Colonel of Hamilton's Tory regiment. He had been an active Tory and committed many depredations upon the Whigs before his departure, and is especially named with others in Laws of 1779, chapter 2, and of l782, chapter 6, as one whose property was to confiscated. In those days there were no post-offices or country stores for the congregating of the people. The flouring nulls were the points of assembling, and the roads usually named for the mills to which they led.

    Derick Ramsaur, who was among the first Germans (generally called Dutch) emigrants to Tryon County, erected his mill prior to 177O on the west bank of Clark's Creek, where the Morganton road bridge at Lincolnton now spans the stream.

    The German population in North Carolina, who mostly came here from Pennsylvania, were, during the Revolutionary war, generally favorable to Great Britain. Some have attributed this to the fact that the "reigning" family (Brunswick) was German and that George was King of Hanover as well as of Great Britain. However this may have been in the Revolution, it does not seem to have been in evidence during the Regulation troubles. After the battle of Alamance, Governor Tryon wrote the Secretary of State that the counties of Mecklenburg, Tryon and western Rowan beyond Yadkin were contemplating hostilities and that he had sent General Wadell with the militia of those counties and some other troops to require the inhabitants to take the oath of allegiance. One of the points at which they were assembled for this purpose was Ramsaur's Mill. This would hardly have been the case if the people of this region had not been in sympathy with the Regulators. Having taken the oath of allegiance to King George, it was not strange that they should have felt inclined to regard its obligations, especially when those who were urging them to take up arms against the King were the very men who had administered the oath to them.

    General Rutherford, Colonel Neal, Captains Alexander, Shaw and others were at that time officers of the militia. They had sympathized with the Regulators on account of common wrongs and oppressions which they suffered, and knew what the evils were which they wished remedied. Now the cause of action is taxation, about which they had little interest and perhaps less knowledge. The Germans, as a race, are a confiding, trusting people to those in whom they have confidence and who act candidly with them, but they seldom live long enough to forgive any one who deceives them or who acts so as to forfeit their confidence. At this time the cause of America was in a depressed state, and many loyal hearts lost hope. It is not improbable that at least some of these people anticipated with pleasure the time they should behold Griffith Rutherford and his comrades with bared heads arid uplifted hands affirming their loyalty to King George and repeating the role they had compelled them to act in 1771; at any rate, they were not inclined at their behest to violate the oath they had forced them to swear.

    The friends of Britain in Tryon County were not confined to the Germans; there were probably as large a per cent. of the English Tories. Neither Moore nor Welch were German. Colonel Moore returned to the vicinity and appointed a meeting for June 10th at his father's (Moses Moore) residence on Indian Creek, seven miles from Ramsaur's. The place of the "Tory Camp" is still pointed out, and is on the Gaston side of the county line on the plantation which was owned by the late Captain John II. Roberts. Forty men met him on that day. He delivered Lord Cornwallis' message, but before they dispersed a messenger informed them that Major Joseph McDowell (who was one of the most ubiquitous officers of the North Carolina militia during the Revolution) was in the neighborhood endeavoring to capture some of the men who were present. Moore, having a force double in number to that of McDowell, sought him and followed him to South Mountains, but did not overtake him. He then dismissed the men with directions to meet at Ramsaur's Mill on the 13th of the month.

    About two hundred assembled. Nicholas Welch, who had lived just above Moore on Indian Creek, went from this vicinity eighteen months prior to this arid joined the British army. He appeared dressed in a new uniform and exhibiting a considerable quantity of gold coins, representing himself as Major of Hamilton's Regiment He urged the men to embody at once, telling of the fall of Charleston, Buford's defeat and the bad condition of affairs for the Americans everywhere. By his narratives and judicious use of his guineas he prevailed over Moore and it was determined to organize at once. Eleven hundred men had assembled at Ramsaur's, to which Captains Murray and Whitson of Lower Creek, Burke (Caldwell) County, added two hundred on the 18th. Colonel Moore, although the embodying was contrary to his advice, assumed command. He led a force to capture Colonel Hugh Brevard and Major Jo. McDowell, who came into the vicinity with a small company of Whigs, but they evaded him.

    On the 19th, with his command of thirteen hundred men, he occupied a ridge three hundred yards east of the mill and which extended east from the road leading from Tuckasegee Ford to Ramsaur's Mill, where it joined the road from Sherrill's Ford, and placed his outposts and pickets in advance, the pickets being six hundred yards from the main force, and upon the Tuckasegee Road. The ridge had a gentle slope and was open, except a few trees, for two hundred yards , its foot was bounded by a glade, the side of which was covered with bushes. The glade was between the Tuckasegee and Sherrill's Ford Roads.

    THE WHIGS.

    General Rutherford, learning of the advance of Lord Rawdon to Waxhaw Creek, ordered a portion of his command, the militia of the Salisbury District, Rowan, Mecklenburg and Tryon Counties, into service for a tour of three months. This force rendezvoused at Reese's plantation, eighteen miles northeast of Charlotte, June 12th. Learning that the British had returned to Hanging Rock General Rutherford advanced ten miles to Mallard Creek, and on the 14th organized his forces for the campaign. This point on Mallard Creek is several times mentioned in Revolutionary papers as occupied by Whig forces. Hearing that the Tories were embodying in Tryon County, lie ordered Colonel Francis Locke, of Rowan, and Major David Wilson, of Mecklenburg, to raise a force in northern Mecklenburg and west Rowan to disperse the Tories, as he did not think his present force could undertake this task until Lord Rawdon's intentions were developed.

    On the 18th Major [David] Wilson, with sixty-five men, among whom were Captains Patrick Knox and William Smith, crossed the Catawba at Toole's Ford, about fourteen miles from Charlotte, near where Moore's Ferry was for many years and Allison's Ferry is now. The ford has been seldom used since 1865, and has been abandoned as a crossing for many years. It is three miles below Cowan's Ford.

    Taking the Beattie's Ford Road, he soon met Major Jo. McDowell with twenty-five men, among whom were Captain Daniel McKissick and John Bowman. Major McDowell, who had been moving about the country awaiting re-inforcements, probably informed him of the position occupied by the Tories. These troops, in order to unite with the forces being raised by Colonel Locke, kept the road up the river, passing Beattie's Ford, and three miles above, Captains Falls, Houston, Torrence, Reid and CaIdwell, who had crossed at McEwen's Ford with forty men, joined them. McEwen's Ford was near where McConnell's Ferry was, up to 1870, but both ford and ferry have long been abandoned.

    Marching the road that is now the Newton Road, past Flemming's Cross Roads, they camped on Mountain Creek at a place called the "Glades," sixteen miles from Ramsaur's. here, on the 19th, they received additional forces under Colonel Locke, amounting to two hundred and seventy men, among whom were Captains Brandon, Sharpe, William Alexander, Smith, Dobson, Sloan and Hardin. Colonel Locke had collected most of this force as he proceeded up the river and had crossed with them at Sherrill's Ford, which is used to this day, and where General Morgan crossed the following January. The whole force now amounted to about four hundred - McDowell's, Fall's and Brandon's men (perhaps one hundred) being mounted.

    A council of war was convened to determine plan for action. The proximity of the Tories and the small number of the Whigs made it necessary for quick movement, as the Tories would probably move against them as soon as they learned the true condition. Some proposed to cross the river at Sherrill's Ford, six miles in the rear, and to hold it against the Tories. It was replied to this that a retreat would embolden the Tories and that the re-inforcement to the Tories, who already outnumbered them three to one, would probably be greater than to them. Then it was suggested to move down the river to join Rutherford, who was about forty-five mils distant. It was objected to this that nearly all the serviceable Whigs of this section were with them or Rutherford, and this would leave their families unprotected and exposed to pillage by the Tories; also the Tories might be in motion and they encounter them on the march. Then came the insinuation that these suggestions came from fear, or at least from unwillingness to meet the Tories, and a proposition to march during the night and attack the Tories early next morning as they would be ignorant of their numbers and could be easily routed. This had the usual effect; not many soldiers or other people can stand an imputation of cowardice. So this plan was adopted.

    Colonel James Johnston, who lived in Tryon (now Gaston) County near Toole's Ford, and who had joined Major [David] Wilson when he crossed the river, was dispatched to inform General Rutherford of their action. Late in the evening they marched down the south side of Anderson's Mountain, and taking the "State" Road, stopped at the Mountain Spring to arrange a plan of battle. It was agreed that Brandon's, Fall's and McDowell's men, being mounted, should open the attack, the footmen to follow, and every man, without awaiting orders, govern himself as developments might make necessary as the fight proceeded.

    The British having retired to Camden, General Rutherford determined to give his attention to Colonel Moore, On the 18th of June he marched to Tuckasegee Ford, twelve miles from Charlotte and twenty miles from Ramsaur's. He dispatched a message to Colonel Locke, directing him to meet him with his command at General Joseph Dickson's, three miles from Tuckasegee (and where Mr. Ural M. Johnston, a great grandson of James Johnston, now lives), on the evening of the 19th or morning of the 20th. That afternoon he moved to the Dickson place. The morning of the 19th was wet, and fearing the arms might be out of condition, at midday, when it cleared off, he ordered them to be discharged and examined. The firing was heard in the adjacent county; the people thinking that the enemy were endeavoring to cross the river, volunteers came to re-inforce the Whigs. At the Catawba, Colonel William Graham, with the Lincoln County Regiment, united with General Rutherford, whose command now numbered twelve hundred. Colonel Johnston reached General Rutherford about ten o'clock at night, who, thinking his courier had informed Colonel Locke, waited until early next morning before moving, when he marched for Ramsaur's.

    The BATTLE.

    Leaving the mountain, Colonel Locke's force would follow the "State" Road until they came into what is now Buffalo Shoal Road, then into Sherrill's Ford Road as it ran to Ramsaur's Mill. A mile from the mill they were met by Adam Reep with a small company, perhaps twenty. Reep was a noted Whig, and although his neighbors generally were loyal to King George, he was leader of a few patriots who were always ready to answer his call to arms. The story which tradition tells of his acts would make a base for a fine narrative of Revolutionary times. He gave full account of the Tory position, and further arrangements were made as to plan of attack. There are two roads mentioned in General Graham's account of this battle in "General Joseph Graham and His Revolutionary Papers." He speaks of the road, i.e., Tuckasegee Road, and this road i.e., the old or Sherrill's Ford Road, the track of which is still visible. They united at the western end of the ridge and just beyond the glade. The road at the right of the Tory position is now a cut eight feet or more deep; then it was on top of the ground. The Tories were on the right of the cavalry, who came the old road, and left of the infantry, who came the Tuckasegee Road - the center of the line being between the attacking parties.

    There seems to have been three attacking parties: First, mounted men, probably under McDowell, on the old road ; second, mainly infantry, under Locke, on the Tuckasegee Road, upon which the Tory picket was placed, near where. the Burton residence is now ; third, Captain Hardin, Mb came over the hill where Lincolnton now stands, then through the ravine near McLoud's house and gained position on the right flank of the Tories.

    The central party was formed, cavalry in front, infantry in two ranks in the rear-they moved by flank. The cavalry discovering the picket, chased them to camp. McDowell's men had pushed on and reached the enemy about the same time, and both parties, leaving the road, rode up within thirty steps of the enemy and opened fire. The enemy were considerably demoralized at first, but seeing so few (not over one hundred) in the attacking party, rallied and poured such a volley into them that they retired through the infantry, some of whom joined them and never returned. Most of the cavalry reformed and returned to the contest. Captain Bowman had been killed. Captain Falls, being mortally wounded, rode some two hundred yards and fell dead from his horse where the Sherrill's Ford Road turned down the hill. This spot is still noted. The infantry, nothing daunted, pushed forward, and, coming to the end of the glade, began to form by what is now called "by the right, front into line," and to open fire as each man came into position. The six hundred yards pursuit had much disorganized their line. The Tories advanced down the hill and endeavored to disperse them before they could form. As the Whigs came on they filled gaps and extended the line to their right and made it so hot that the enemy retreated to the top of the hill and a little beyond, so as to partly protect their bodies. The Whigs pursued them, but the fire was so deadly and their loss so heavy that they in turn retreated down the hill to the bushes at the edge of the glade.

    The Tories again advanced half way down the ridge. In the midst of the fight at this time Captain Hardin arrived at his position behind the fence on the right flank of the Tories and opened fire. Captain Sharpe had extended the line until he turned the left of the enemy, and his company began firing from that direction (about where Mr. Roseman's barn now stands). The Tories, hard pressed in front, fell back to the top of the ridge, and, finding that they were still exposed to Hardin's fire on the right, as well as to that of Sharpe on the left, broke and fled down the hill and across the creek, many being shot as they ran.

    When the Whigs gained the hill they saw quite a force of the enemy over the creek near the mill and supposed the attack would be renewed. Forming line, they could only master eighty-six, and after earnest exertions only one hundred and ten could be paraded. Major Wilson and Captain William Alexander, of Rowan, were dispatched to hurry General Rutherford forward; they met his forces about where Salem Baptist Church now stands, six and a half miles from Lincolnton, on the old narrow-gauge railroad; Davie's Cavalry was started at a gallop and the infantry at quick-step. Within two miles they met men from the field, who told them the result. When the battle began the Tories who had no arms went across the creek.

    Captain Murray was killed early in the action; his and Whitson's men immediately followed. Colonel Moore made his headquarters behind a locust-tree near the road. Upon his right flank becoming exposed to the galling fire of Hardin, he did not wait to see the end, and was joined by Major Welch in his change of base.

    Captain Sharpe's men, in deploying to the right, went beyond the crest of the ridge (below the present Roseman barn). here, exposed to the deadly aim of the enemy's rifles, they advanced from tree to tree until they obtained a position enfilading the enemy, and with unerring aim picked off their boldest officers. Captain Sharpe's brother placed his gun against a tree to "draw a bead" on a Tory captain; his arm was broken by a shot from the enemy and his gun fell to the ground. A well-directed shot from the Captain felled the Tory captain and contributed much to the speedy termination of the battle. General Graham says that at this end of the Tory line "one tree at the root of which two brothers lay dead was grazed by three balls on one side and two on the other."

    Colonel Moore, fearing pursuit, sent a flag of truce to propose suspension of hostilities to bury the dead and care for the wounded; but ordered all footmen and poorly-mounted men to leave for home at once. Colonel Locke, not wishing the enemy to discover the paucity of his forces, sent Major James Rutherford (a son of the General, and who was killed at Eutaw) to meet the flag. In answer to the request of Moore, he demanded surrender in ten minutes; the flag returned, when Moore and the fifty who remained with him immediately fled. Moore reached Cornwallis with about thirty followers, was put under arrest, threatened with court-martial for disobedience of orders, but was finally released.>

    In some instances this was a fight between neighbors and kindred, although there were not many Whigs in the Lincoln forces-the militia of the county being with Colonel Graham, who was with Rutherford.

    In the thickest of the fight a Dutch Tory, seeing an acquaintance, said: "How do you do, Pilly? I have knowed you since you was a little boy, and never knew no harm of you except you was a rebel." Billy, who was out for business and not to renew acquaintance, as his gun was empty, clubbed it and made a pass at his friend's head, who dodged and said:

    "Stop! Stop! I am not going to stand still and be killed like a damn fool, needer," and immediately made a lick at Billy's head, which he dodged. A friend of Billy whose gun was loaded put it to the Dutchman's side and shot him dead.

    Captain McKissick, who was shot through the shoulder early in the action, went over towards Lincolnton en route to a friend's. He met Abram Keener, a Tory captain, but personal friend, with ten companions, who had been to a neighboring farm, and were returning to camp. His companions would have treated Captain McKissick badly, probably killed him; but Keener took him prisoner and protected him. On reaching the camp, and seeing a good many strange faces with his acquaintances, who were prisoners, Keener said: "Hey, boys, you seem to have a good many prisoners." The Whigs, by his speech, knew he was a Tory, and were going to shoot him and his companions, but Captain McKissick interfered, and by earnest appeal saved their lives.

    Adam Reep, as part of the history of the battle was accustomed to tell that the Tories took all his cattle, including his bull, and drove them to their camp; that when the firing began the Tories soon began to pass his house, which was some three miles away, and it was not long before "old John" appeared in the procession bellowing: "Lib-er-ty! Lib-er-ty!! Liber-ty!!!"

    There was no official report of the battle, consequently the exact number of casualties was never known. The badge of the Tories was a green pine twig in the hat. In the heat of battle some of these would fall out and others were thrown away, so that it could not be told to which side many belonged.

    Fifty-six dead lay on the face of the ridge, up and down which the forces advanced and retreated. Thirteen of these were of Captain Sharpe's Fourth Creek (Statesville) Company. Many bodies lay scattered over the hill. The killed were seventy or more, forty of whom were Whigs. The wounded were one hundred on each side, some of whom afterwards died from their wounds. Among the Whigs killed were Captains Dobson, Falls, Armstrong, Smith, Sloan and Bowman. Captains McKissick and Houston were wounded. Some of the Whigs wore a piece of white paper in their hats as a badge. Several of them were shot through the head. Many of the dead were buried on the field. Wives, mothers, daughters and other kindred of the contestants came that afternoon and next morning to inquire for their friends. As they discovered them among the dead and dying, there were heart-rending scenes of distress and grief. Mrs. Falls came twenty-five miles on horseback, accompanied by her negro cook. Finding her gallant husband dead, she obtained a quilt from Mrs. Reinhardt, whose husband lived near the battleground, and carried his body across Sherrill's Ford and buried it with his kindred.

    The troops engaged, except Reep of Lincoln, and Major [David] Wilson, Captains Knox and Smith of Mecklenburg, were from (what to 1777 had been) Rowan County. The officers' surnames were found among the militia officers of the county in the proceedings of the "Committee of Safety," of which many of them were members. Captain John Hardin's beat was along Lord Granville's line from Silver Creek in Burke to South Fork, and from these. two points to the Catawba River. Captain Joseph Dobson was within its bounds. Much the largest portion of the troops was from what is now Iredell County. Captain John Sloan was from Fourth Creek. I do not think all who are mentioned as captains held that position at this time; some may have been prior to and some became so afterward. No account was written until forty years had elapsed. There seems to have been but few commands given in the engagement; officers and privates acted as occasion required, and both suffered severely.>

    This was a battle between the ancestors of the North Carolina Confederate soldier, and taking armament and surroundings into consideration, is about a sample of what would have been witnessed in North Carolina in I861-'65 if those who believed the proper course to pursue for redress of wrongs was to "fight in the Union" had refused to fight outside, or if Pettigrew's and Cooke's forces had been pitted against Lane's and McRae's.

    Tradition says Locke's men got some liquor at "Dellinger's Tavern" as they were going into the fight. This tavern stood on the present Robinson block in Lincolnton. At that time Henry Dellinger kept a tavern seven miles from Lincolnton at a cross-road, where John B. Smith now lives. It was probably Rutherford's men en-route to the battlefield who "took courage" at Dellinger's Tavern.


    IMPORTANCE OF THE BATTLE.

    This battle is but little known in history, yet is one of the most important in results and best fought of the Revolution. King's Mountain and Ramsaur's Mill at that time were both in Lincoln County, and not twenty miles apart. If Moore had obeyed Lord Cornwallis, and delayed organization until Ferguson advanced, he could have re-inforced him with two thousand men. If the Whigs had been defeated matters would have been in even worse condition. Ramsaur's Mill was the first and most important "act" in King's Mountain. It destroyed Toryism in that section and caused Bryan, with his followers, to leave the "forks of the Yadkin" and not return until Cornwallis came. The Dutch, as they had kept the oath to King George, kept their "parole" to the American cause. Cornwallis marched through this country the following January and camped at Ramsaur's Mill. He lost more by desertion than he gained in recruits. When he was here, Morgan passed the present site of Maiden, nine miles distant, and for five days was not twenty miles from him. A messenger on any of these days would have enabled Cornwallis to place his army between Morgan and the Catawba River. I do not think, in killed and wounded, in proportion to numbers engaged, the battle is equalled in the Revolution. Forty killed and one hundred wounded, out of four hundred engaged, is high class, even in Confederate annals. The defeat and rout of three times their number is certainly worthy of note. No attempt has been made to preserve the features of this battle-ground; to-day it is tilled by the plow of the farmer, and but slight mementoes of the battle can be seen. On the highest point of the ridge is a head-stone marking three Tory graves. One at the foot of the hill marks another. A brick wall near where the severest fighting was done contains the remains of Captain Dobson where he fell; also the remains of his daughter and her husband, Wallace Alexander, who were buried beside him some years after the Revolution. The battle-field is within the corporate limits of Lincolnton.


    AFTER THE BATTLE.

    General Rutherford remained here two days, sending Davie's Cavalry and other troops through the country arresting Tories who were nearly all "paroled" a few who had committed serious depredations being sent to Salisbury jail to await trial at next term of court. Being informed that Colonel Bryan, the noted Tory, had organized his forces in the "forks of the Yadkin" he determined to give him attention. On mustering his troops, he found he had only two hundred men of the sixteen hundred present two days before. This is a fair sample of the conduct of the Mecklenburg and Rowan in the Revolution. They would answer all calls to fight, hut when the battle was over, or while preparation was being made, they declined to undergo the wearisomeness of camp-life. General Rutherford did not, as would be done now, send details to bring the absentees back, but sent messengers ahead along the road he would march, and before he reached the vicinity of Bryan he had six hundred men. Bryan immediately fled, and most of Rutherford's men sought their fire-sides-this time by his permission.
  2. [S395] Lisa (Crockett) Richmond e-mail, e-mail address, Jan 2008 - Jan 2017,.
  3. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
  4. [S1] Susan Jacks <e-mail address>
    Thanks to Susan for the pictures of the old chair.

Margery McEwen

F, b. 27 July 1772, d. 21 April 1841
  • Last Edited: 25 Feb 2019
  • Name-Psbly: Marjorie Mary McEwen2
  • (Child) Birth*: 27 July 1772; Rowan Co., North Carolina; Margarett (as her name was spelled in the Larkin Strickland Family Bible) was the daughter of James Stewart and Margery McEwen. Margery's ancestry can be found in the book, "Dickson - McEwen & Allied Families." This writer (Lew Griffin) has many autosomal DNA matches to the McEwen family, as do many other Larkin Strickland descendants.
  • (Bride) Marriage*: 25 March 1794; Groom=James Stewart
  • Married Name: 25 March 1794; Stewart
  • (Deceased) Death*: 21 April 1841; Troup Co., Georgia
  • Research Note: 13 November 2004; Margery's maiden name, by recent tradition, is said to have been "McGee" or "McGhee" or "McGehee" but no evidence in favor of this has ever been found. Extensive research has been done on the McGehee line in particular, with no evidence turning up in favor of this connection. A major two-volume book on the McGehee family published some years ago now has been searched. The evidence in favor of this theory seems to be that she had a grandson named James McGehee Stewart. But she had a son named James McEWEN Stewart.3
  • Research Note: 12 April 2009; Subject: James McEwen & daughter Margery McEwen Stewart
    Date: Sunday, April 12, 2009, 2:00 PM
    
    I do not have a copy of the will to see what it says or the date. Deeds and probate minutes might help. I am not sure what books are being indexed on this website.
    
    http://www.tngenweb.org/rutherford/mc.htm
    McEwing, James Book No. 3, P29, P46
    McEwin, Jas. A. Dec'd Book No. 16, P714, P718
    and other McEwens
    
    Cathy Fitch, Rutherford Co. TN
    4
  • Research Note*: 10 May 2014; From the Dickson-McEwen book:
    Marjorie Mary McEwen married James Stewart. Their children included Marjorie (sic) Stewart who married Mr. Strichland (sic); James Stewart; John Stewart; Davie Stewart, and William Stewart.5

Family: James Stewart b. 16 Apr 1765, d. 6 Feb 1854

Citations

  1. [S1941] Austin W. Smith, Dickson - McEwen & Allied Families.
    Page 227.
  2. [S1941] Austin W. Smith, Dickson - McEwen & Allied Families.
    Page 237.
  3. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
  4. [S388] Judy Ellen (James) Bute e-mail, e-mail address, Feb 2009,.
  5. [S1941] Austin W. Smith, Dickson - McEwen & Allied Families.
    Pages 237 and 238.

James Stewart

M, b. 24 December 1723, d. 17 February 1817
  • Last Edited: 25 Feb 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: 24 December 1723
  • Note*: 18 June 1739; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; This could not have been the James Stewart who married Elizabeth Davies on June 18, 1739 at Christ Church in Philadelphia, as George Edson, editor of the Stewart Clan Magazine, speculated. Christ Church was an Episcopalian church, and these Stewarts of Hanover township were Presbyterians.2,3
  • (Groom) Marriage*: circa 1756; Bride=Mary (?)
  • Note: before 1760; Prior to 1760, Peter, David, and James removed to North Carolina This is where the three were living in 1784-5, when the estate of the first Lazarus was finally distributed among the heirs.3
  • (Deceased) Death*: 17 February 1817; Georgia
  • Research Note*: 1896; Commemorative Biographical Encyclopedia of Dauphin County,
    Containing Sketches of Representative Citizens, and Many of the
    Early Scotch-Irish and German Settlers. Chambersburg, Pa.:
    J. M. Runk & Company, 1896, pages 146-149.

    THE STEWARTS OF HANOVER.

    I. LAZARUS STEWART, a native of the north of Ireland, came to
    America in 1729, the same year locating on a tract of land "situate on
    Swahatawro creek," in then Lancaster county. This tract of three
    hundred acres was directed to be surveyed for him by the Proprietaries
    on the 6th of March, 1739. With the aid of two Redemptioners, whose
    passages were paid by him, he built within that and the two years
    following a house and barn, cleared twenty odd acres of arable land and
    planted an orchard. He died about 1744. His farm was a long time in
    dispute owing to the fact that the warrant never having been issued his
    son Lazarus took out a warrant for the same land. After the death of
    the first Lazarus' wife a suit was brought by William Stewart, eldest
    son of John Stewart, for the recovery of his share in his grandfather's
    estate. A distribution was made in 1785, from the record of which in the Orphans' court proceedings we have the foundation of the
    genealogy herewith given. There is no information as to the name or
    the date of death of the first Lazarus Stewart's wife. They may have
    had other children, but the following are the names of all who reached
    mature years:
    2. i. John, b. 1712; m. Frances _____.
    3. ii. Margaret, b. 1714; m. James Stewart.
    4. iii. Margery, b. 1716; m. John Young.
    iv. Lazarus, b. 1718.
    v. Peter, b. in 1720; took up one hundred acres of land
    adjoining Andrew Lykens and William Campbell, in Hanover township,
    surveyed to him on the 17th of September, 1743. Prior to 1760 he
    removed to North Carolina; m., and left issue.
    vi. James, b. 1722; took up one hundred and fifty acres of
    land "adjoining Lazarus Stewart and James Murray on Swahawtawro creek,
    in Hanover township," surveyed to him on the 2d of December, 1738. He
    married and removed to North Carolina with his brother.
    From Lew Griffin: The James with the 1738 land was actually James Steuart or Stewart, born 1708, son of George Steuart, and nephew of Margaret Steuart, wife of Lazarus. See him elsewhere in this file.
    vii. David, b. 1724; m., and removed with his brothers to North
    Carolina.
    4,2
  • Biography*: 1904; The Stewart family traditions were written down about 1904 by James Elmer Stewart, who got "the leading facts" of his sketch from Lewis B. Stewart, born 1819, son of David Stewart: " There were three brothers, James, William, and John Stewart, emigrated to America sometime in the early part of 1700. James Stewart settled ln Iredell County, North Carolina, William Stewart settled in Virginia, and John Stewart settled in Pennsylvania. They emigrated from Ireland and were descendants of the crown heads of Scotland and England. "James Stewart had a son James who was seven years of age when his father landed in America. When he grew up to manhood he married a Miss Mary Stewart and to them were born seven sons four daughters, as follows: William, Lazarus, James, John, George, David, Samuel, Margery, Margaret, Mary, and Martha. "James, the father of this large family, raised all to manhood and womanhood except Martha, the youngest, who died when quite young. "James Stewart lent his aid toward getting the Independence of the United States. In one battle of the Revolutionary War, he was slightly wounded. This was a battle between the Whigs and Tories, 500 Whigs and 1400 Tories. The Whigs were successful and took more prisoners than the Whigs had rank and file. "At the close of the Revolutionary War, Mary Stewart, his wife, died and about the year 1800, James Stewart died in Georgia at the home of his son David, at the age of 96 years. He died while sitting in a chair." As The Stewart Clan Magazine pointed out in the April 1962 issue, p.219: "There is a palpable telescoping of generations in the preceding account unless Sunny Jim, coming from Ireland in knee-pants in 1712, did his skirmishing with the Tories when he was in his 70's." A Bible record, of unknown authenticity, has James born in 1723 and dying in 1817.
  • Research Note: January 1939; James Stewart was living in Iredell county in 1796 "within four miles of the island ford of the Catawba River." The census of 1790 shows three James Stuarts living in Iredell County; this one may have been listed 3-0-1-0-4 -- a son over 16 years old, and four slaves. The courthouse was burned in 1854 and the marriage bonds were destroyed. Son: George, Feb 22, 1773; m. Feb 11, 1796, Jane Boyd.5
  • Research Note: 25 August 2008; see:
    HILL - JORDAN - KLAGES FAMILIES and Related Lines on Rootsweb at:
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cjhill&id=I02360
  • Research Note*: April 2009; Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 12:12 PM

    .... Would this Capt Sloan, killed at the Battle of Ramseur's Mill on 20 June 1780, be the father of Anne Sloane, wife of David Mitchell Stewart? If this is correct, then both James Stewart born 1723 and James Stewart born 1765 were fighting in the Rev. War under General Rutherford and Capt Sloan. The only difference was General Rutherford ordered the Militia of Salisbury District, Rowan, Mecklenburg & Tyron Counties for service of a tour for three months. This would explain why James Stewart born 1723 was only in one battle (see paragraph highlighted in blue). This would also mean that William Stewart, son of James born 1723, was in this same battle, since it was stated he was in the same battle with his father and was wounded.This is very interesting and would love to have your comments.
    Lois: Look at the copy of the Rev. War records that you have and see if it states that James Stewart born 1765 served under Gen. Rutherford and Capt Sloan and also see if it states when he entered the war. The information I have says that he entered service in April 1781 under Capt John Sloan's company which would not jive if Capt John Sloan died 20 June 1780.; Principal=William Stewart, Witness=James Stewart6
  • Research Note: 17 July 2011

Family: Mary (?) b. 28 Sep 1736, d. Nov 1794

Citations

  1. [S1] LDS Family Tree ID # LHXG-CJL.
  2. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
  3. [S397] "Stewart Clan Magazine".
    Nov. 1928, Vol. VII, No.5, p.81.
  4. [S1] http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/dauphin/history/family/runk-7-stewart-lazarus.txt.
  5. [S397] "Stewart Clan Magazine".
    Jan 1939, page 29.
  6. [S400] Judy Griffin e-mail, e-mail address, Apr 2009,.
    merican Revolution...Battle of Ramseur’s Mill

    The Battle of Ramseur’s Mill
    June 20, 1780

    According to several historical accounts, Capt Patrick Knox was killed in the American Revolution at the "Battle of Ramsour's Mill," 20 June 1780, in Lincolnton, Lincoln Co, NC. In his book "Sketches of Western North Carolina" published 1877, (page 215), author C. L. Hunter states,

    "Of the Whig officers, Captains Falls, Knox, Dobson, Smith, Bowman, Sloan, and Armstrong were killed.... Captain Patrick Knox was mortally wounded in the thigh; an artery being severed, he very soon died from the resulting hemorrhage…Captains Hugh Torrance, David Caldwell, John Reid, all of Rowan, and Capt Smith of Mecklenburg, came out of the conflict unhurt."

    This indicates there were two Capt Smiths...one was killed and the other unhurt in the conflict. One was Captain William Smith according to William A. Graham’s account, the other Captain Smith, also of Mecklenburg, is unnamed, but I speculate this was “Smith” the brother of Mary, the widow of Captain Patrick Knox, and who is named in Patrick’s estate papers. This Captain Smith wa[s possibly David Smith who died in 1823, Mecklenburg Co, NC.

    William A. Graham, Major on Staff of Adjutant General of North Carolina, states in his 1904 account of "The Battle of Ramsaur's Mill" that

    "On the 18th [June, 1780], Major [David] Wilson, with sixty-five men, among whom were Captains Patrick Knox and William Smith, crossed the Catawba at Toole's Ford, about fourteen miles from Charlotte, near where Moore's Ferry was for many years and Allison's Ferry is now. The ford has been seldom used since 1865, and has been abandoned as a crossing for many years. It is three miles below Cowan's Ford."

    Major Grahams complete account is given below:

    THE BATTLE OF RAMSAUR'S MILL, June 20,1780
    By William A. Graham ,
    Major on Staff of Adjutant General of North Carolina

    Sir Henry Clinton, after the surrender of Charleston in May, 1780, regarded the Royal authority as restored in Georgia and South Carolina, and, leaving Lord Cornwallis in command with a force, which was regarded, with the anticipated re-inforcements from friends in upper South Carolina and North Carolina, as sufficient to subdue North Carolina, sailed with his main army to New York.

    Lord Cornwallis plan of campaign was to move with the main body of regulars by a central route through Charlotte and Salisbury, and to send a small force under a competent commander to his right to organize his friends in the upper Cape Fear section, and another force to his left to embody the adherents of Britain in upper South Carolina and in Tryon County; to re-inforce his main army and also to protect his outposts from the attacks of McDowell, Cleavland and others aided by the "over the mountain men," as those beyond the Blue Ridge were called. The crops of the previous year being consumed, he delayed his movement until that of 1780 could be harvested and threshed. The section around Ramsaur's Mill was then, as it is now, very fine for wheat. He sent

    Colonel John Moore into this country to inform the people that be was coming and would reward and protect the loyal, but would inflict dire punishment upon his opponents; for them to secure the wheat crop and be in readiness, but to make no organization until he should direct.

    The TORIES.

    Moore had gone from this section and joined the British army some time previous and had been made Lieutenant-Colonel of Hamilton's Tory regiment. He had been an active Tory and committed many depredations upon the Whigs before his departure, and is especially named with others in Laws of 1779, chapter 2, and of l782, chapter 6, as one whose property was to confiscated. In those days there were no post-offices or country stores for the congregating of the people. The flouring nulls were the points of assembling, and the roads usually named for the mills to which they led.

    Derick Ramsaur, who was among the first Germans (generally called Dutch) emigrants to Tryon County, erected his mill prior to 177O on the west bank of Clark's Creek, where the Morganton road bridge at Lincolnton now spans the stream.

    The German population in North Carolina, who mostly came here from Pennsylvania, were, during the Revolutionary war, generally favorable to Great Britain. Some have attributed this to the fact that the "reigning" family (Brunswick) was German and that George was King of Hanover as well as of Great Britain. However this may have been in the Revolution, it does not seem to have been in evidence during the Regulation troubles. After the battle of Alamance, Governor Tryon wrote the Secretary of State that the counties of Mecklenburg, Tryon and western Rowan beyond Yadkin were contemplating hostilities and that he had sent General Wadell with the militia of those counties and some other troops to require the inhabitants to take the oath of allegiance. One of the points at which they were assembled for this purpose was Ramsaur's Mill. This would hardly have been the case if the people of this region had not been in sympathy with the Regulators. Having taken the oath of allegiance to King George, it was not strange that they should have felt inclined to regard its obligations, especially when those who were urging them to take up arms against the King were the very men who had administered the oath to them.

    General Rutherford, Colonel Neal, Captains Alexander, Shaw and others were at that time officers of the militia. They had sympathized with the Regulators on account of common wrongs and oppressions which they suffered, and knew what the evils were which they wished remedied. Now the cause of action is taxation, about which they had little interest and perhaps less knowledge. The Germans, as a race, are a confiding, trusting people to those in whom they have confidence and who act candidly with them, but they seldom live long enough to forgive any one who deceives them or who acts so as to forfeit their confidence. At this time the cause of America was in a depressed state, and many loyal hearts lost hope. It is not improbable that at least some of these people anticipated with pleasure the time they should behold Griffith Rutherford and his comrades with bared heads arid uplifted hands affirming their loyalty to King George and repeating the role they had compelled them to act in 1771; at any rate, they were not inclined at their behest to violate the oath they had forced them to swear.

    The friends of Britain in Tryon County were not confined to the Germans; there were probably as large a per cent. of the English Tories. Neither Moore nor Welch were German. Colonel Moore returned to the vicinity and appointed a meeting for June 10th at his father's (Moses Moore) residence on Indian Creek, seven miles from Ramsaur's. The place of the "Tory Camp" is still pointed out, and is on the Gaston side of the county line on the plantation which was owned by the late Captain John II. Roberts. Forty men met him on that day. He delivered Lord Cornwallis' message, but before they dispersed a messenger informed them that Major Joseph McDowell (who was one of the most ubiquitous officers of the North Carolina militia during the Revolution) was in the neighborhood endeavoring to capture some of the men who were present. Moore, having a force double in number to that of McDowell, sought him and followed him to South Mountains, but did not overtake him. He then dismissed the men with directions to meet at Ramsaur's Mill on the 13th of the month.

    About two hundred assembled. Nicholas Welch, who had lived just above Moore on Indian Creek, went from this vicinity eighteen months prior to this arid joined the British army. He appeared dressed in a new uniform and exhibiting a considerable quantity of gold coins, representing himself as Major of Hamilton's Regiment He urged the men to embody at once, telling of the fall of Charleston, Buford's defeat and the bad condition of affairs for the Americans everywhere. By his narratives and judicious use of his guineas he prevailed over Moore and it was determined to organize at once. Eleven hundred men had assembled at Ramsaur's, to which Captains Murray and Whitson of Lower Creek, Burke (Caldwell) County, added two hundred on the 18th. Colonel Moore, although the embodying was contrary to his advice, assumed command. He led a force to capture Colonel Hugh Brevard and Major Jo. McDowell, who came into the vicinity with a small company of Whigs, but they evaded him.

    On the 19th, with his command of thirteen hundred men, he occupied a ridge three hundred yards east of the mill and which extended east from the road leading from Tuckasegee Ford to Ramsaur's Mill, where it joined the road from Sherrill's Ford, and placed his outposts and pickets in advance, the pickets being six hundred yards from the main force, and upon the Tuckasegee Road. The ridge had a gentle slope and was open, except a few trees, for two hundred yards , its foot was bounded by a glade, the side of which was covered with bushes. The glade was between the Tuckasegee and Sherrill's Ford Roads.

    THE WHIGS.

    General Rutherford, learning of the advance of Lord Rawdon to Waxhaw Creek, ordered a portion of his command, the militia of the Salisbury District, Rowan, Mecklenburg and Tryon Counties, into service for a tour of three months. This force rendezvoused at Reese's plantation, eighteen miles northeast of Charlotte, June 12th. Learning that the British had returned to Hanging Rock General Rutherford advanced ten miles to Mallard Creek, and on the 14th organized his forces for the campaign. This point on Mallard Creek is several times mentioned in Revolutionary papers as occupied by Whig forces. Hearing that the Tories were embodying in Tryon County, lie ordered Colonel Francis Locke, of Rowan, and Major David Wilson, of Mecklenburg, to raise a force in northern Mecklenburg and west Rowan to disperse the Tories, as he did not think his present force could undertake this task until Lord Rawdon's intentions were developed.

    On the 18th Major [David] Wilson, with sixty-five men, among whom were Captains Patrick Knox and William Smith, crossed the Catawba at Toole's Ford, about fourteen miles from Charlotte, near where Moore's Ferry was for many years and Allison's Ferry is now. The ford has been seldom used since 1865, and has been abandoned as a crossing for many years. It is three miles below Cowan's Ford.

    Taking the Beattie's Ford Road, he soon met Major Jo. McDowell with twenty-five men, among whom were Captain Daniel McKissick and John Bowman. Major McDowell, who had been moving about the country awaiting re-inforcements, probably informed him of the position occupied by the Tories. These troops, in order to unite with the forces being raised by Colonel Locke, kept the road up the river, passing Beattie's Ford, and three miles above, Captains Falls, Houston, Torrence, Reid and CaIdwell, who had crossed at McEwen's Ford with forty men, joined them. McEwen's Ford was near where McConnell's Ferry was, up to 1870, but both ford and ferry have long been abandoned.

    Marching the road that is now the Newton Road, past Flemming's Cross Roads, they camped on Mountain Creek at a place called the "Glades," sixteen miles from Ramsaur's. here, on the 19th, they received additional forces under Colonel Locke, amounting to two hundred and seventy men, among whom were Captains Brandon, Sharpe, William Alexander, Smith, Dobson, Sloan and Hardin. Colonel Locke had collected most of this force as he proceeded up the river and had crossed with them at Sherrill's Ford, which is used to this day, and where General Morgan crossed the following January. The whole force now amounted to about four hundred - McDowell's, Fall's and Brandon's men (perhaps one hundred) being mounted.

    A council of war was convened to determine plan for action. The proximity of the Tories and the small number of the Whigs made it necessary for quick movement, as the Tories would probably move against them as soon as they learned the true condition. Some proposed to cross the river at Sherrill's Ford, six miles in the rear, and to hold it against the Tories. It was replied to this that a retreat would embolden the Tories and that the re-inforcement to the Tories, who already outnumbered them three to one, would probably be greater than to them. Then it was suggested to move down the river to join Rutherford, who was about forty-five mils distant. It was objected to this that nearly all the serviceable Whigs of this section were with them or Rutherford, and this would leave their families unprotected and exposed to pillage by the Tories; also the Tories might be in motion and they encounter them on the march. Then came the insinuation that these suggestions came from fear, or at least from unwillingness to meet the Tories, and a proposition to march during the night and attack the Tories early next morning as they would be ignorant of their numbers and could be easily routed. This had the usual effect; not many soldiers or other people can stand an imputation of cowardice. So this plan was adopted.

    Colonel James Johnston, who lived in Tryon (now Gaston) County near Toole's Ford, and who had joined Major [David] Wilson when he crossed the river, was dispatched to inform General Rutherford of their action. Late in the evening they marched down the south side of Anderson's Mountain, and taking the "State" Road, stopped at the Mountain Spring to arrange a plan of battle. It was agreed that Brandon's, Fall's and McDowell's men, being mounted, should open the attack, the footmen to follow, and every man, without awaiting orders, govern himself as developments might make necessary as the fight proceeded.

    The British having retired to Camden, General Rutherford determined to give his attention to Colonel Moore, On the 18th of June he marched to Tuckasegee Ford, twelve miles from Charlotte and twenty miles from Ramsaur's. He dispatched a message to Colonel Locke, directing him to meet him with his command at General Joseph Dickson's, three miles from Tuckasegee (and where Mr. Ural M. Johnston, a great grandson of James Johnston, now lives), on the evening of the 19th or morning of the 20th. That afternoon he moved to the Dickson place. The morning of the 19th was wet, and fearing the arms might be out of condition, at midday, when it cleared off, he ordered them to be discharged and examined. The firing was heard in the adjacent county; the people thinking that the enemy were endeavoring to cross the river, volunteers came to re-inforce the Whigs. At the Catawba, Colonel William Graham, with the Lincoln County Regiment, united with General Rutherford, whose command now numbered twelve hundred. Colonel Johnston reached General Rutherford about ten o'clock at night, who, thinking his courier had informed Colonel Locke, waited until early next morning before moving, when he marched for Ramsaur's.

    The BATTLE.

    Leaving the mountain, Colonel Locke's force would follow the "State" Road until they came into what is now Buffalo Shoal Road, then into Sherrill's Ford Road as it ran to Ramsaur's Mill. A mile from the mill they were met by Adam Reep with a small company, perhaps twenty. Reep was a noted Whig, and although his neighbors generally were loyal to King George, he was leader of a few patriots who were always ready to answer his call to arms. The story which tradition tells of his acts would make a base for a fine narrative of Revolutionary times. He gave full account of the Tory position, and further arrangements were made as to plan of attack. There are two roads mentioned in General Graham's account of this battle in "General Joseph Graham and His Revolutionary Papers." He speaks of the road, i.e., Tuckasegee Road, and this road i.e., the old or Sherrill's Ford Road, the track of which is still visible. They united at the western end of the ridge and just beyond the glade. The road at the right of the Tory position is now a cut eight feet or more deep; then it was on top of the ground. The Tories were on the right of the cavalry, who came the old road, and left of the infantry, who came the Tuckasegee Road - the center of the line being between the attacking parties.

    There seems to have been three attacking parties: First, mounted men, probably under McDowell, on the old road ; second, mainly infantry, under Locke, on the Tuckasegee Road, upon which the Tory picket was placed, near where. the Burton residence is now ; third, Captain Hardin, Mb came over the hill where Lincolnton now stands, then through the ravine near McLoud's house and gained position on the right flank of the Tories.

    The central party was formed, cavalry in front, infantry in two ranks in the rear-they moved by flank. The cavalry discovering the picket, chased them to camp. McDowell's men had pushed on and reached the enemy about the same time, and both parties, leaving the road, rode up within thirty steps of the enemy and opened fire. The enemy were considerably demoralized at first, but seeing so few (not over one hundred) in the attacking party, rallied and poured such a volley into them that they retired through the infantry, some of whom joined them and never returned. Most of the cavalry reformed and returned to the contest. Captain Bowman had been killed. Captain Falls, being mortally wounded, rode some two hundred yards and fell dead from his horse where the Sherrill's Ford Road turned down the hill. This spot is still noted. The infantry, nothing daunted, pushed forward, and, coming to the end of the glade, began to form by what is now called "by the right, front into line," and to open fire as each man came into position. The six hundred yards pursuit had much disorganized their line. The Tories advanced down the hill and endeavored to disperse them before they could form. As the Whigs came on they filled gaps and extended the line to their right and made it so hot that the enemy retreated to the top of the hill and a little beyond, so as to partly protect their bodies. The Whigs pursued them, but the fire was so deadly and their loss so heavy that they in turn retreated down the hill to the bushes at the edge of the glade.

    The Tories again advanced half way down the ridge. In the midst of the fight at this time Captain Hardin arrived at his position behind the fence on the right flank of the Tories and opened fire. Captain Sharpe had extended the line until he turned the left of the enemy, and his company began firing from that direction (about where Mr. Roseman's barn now stands). The Tories, hard pressed in front, fell back to the top of the ridge, and, finding that they were still exposed to Hardin's fire on the right, as well as to that of Sharpe on the left, broke and fled down the hill and across the creek, many being shot as they ran.

    When the Whigs gained the hill they saw quite a force of the enemy over the creek near the mill and supposed the attack would be renewed. Forming line, they could only master eighty-six, and after earnest exertions only one hundred and ten could be paraded. Major Wilson and Captain William Alexander, of Rowan, were dispatched to hurry General Rutherford forward; they met his forces about where Salem Baptist Church now stands, six and a half miles from Lincolnton, on the old narrow-gauge railroad; Davie's Cavalry was started at a gallop and the infantry at quick-step. Within two miles they met men from the field, who told them the result. When the battle began the Tories who had no arms went across the creek.

    Captain Murray was killed early in the action; his and Whitson's men immediately followed. Colonel Moore made his headquarters behind a locust-tree near the road. Upon his right flank becoming exposed to the galling fire of Hardin, he did not wait to see the end, and was joined by Major Welch in his change of base.

    Captain Sharpe's men, in deploying to the right, went beyond the crest of the ridge (below the present Roseman barn). here, exposed to the deadly aim of the enemy's rifles, they advanced from tree to tree until they obtained a position enfilading the enemy, and with unerring aim picked off their boldest officers. Captain Sharpe's brother placed his gun against a tree to "draw a bead" on a Tory captain; his arm was broken by a shot from the enemy and his gun fell to the ground. A well-directed shot from the Captain felled the Tory captain and contributed much to the speedy termination of the battle. General Graham says that at this end of the Tory line "one tree at the root of which two brothers lay dead was grazed by three balls on one side and two on the other."

    Colonel Moore, fearing pursuit, sent a flag of truce to propose suspension of hostilities to bury the dead and care for the wounded; but ordered all footmen and poorly-mounted men to leave for home at once. Colonel Locke, not wishing the enemy to discover the paucity of his forces, sent Major James Rutherford (a son of the General, and who was killed at Eutaw) to meet the flag. In answer to the request of Moore, he demanded surrender in ten minutes; the flag returned, when Moore and the fifty who remained with him immediately fled. Moore reached Cornwallis with about thirty followers, was put under arrest, threatened with court-martial for disobedience of orders, but was finally released.>

    In some instances this was a fight between neighbors and kindred, although there were not many Whigs in the Lincoln forces-the militia of the county being with Colonel Graham, who was with Rutherford.

    In the thickest of the fight a Dutch Tory, seeing an acquaintance, said: "How do you do, Pilly? I have knowed you since you was a little boy, and never knew no harm of you except you was a rebel." Billy, who was out for business and not to renew acquaintance, as his gun was empty, clubbed it and made a pass at his friend's head, who dodged and said:

    "Stop! Stop! I am not going to stand still and be killed like a damn fool, needer," and immediately made a lick at Billy's head, which he dodged. A friend of Billy whose gun was loaded put it to the Dutchman's side and shot him dead.

    Captain McKissick, who was shot through the shoulder early in the action, went over towards Lincolnton en route to a friend's. He met Abram Keener, a Tory captain, but personal friend, with ten companions, who had been to a neighboring farm, and were returning to camp. His companions would have treated Captain McKissick badly, probably killed him; but Keener took him prisoner and protected him. On reaching the camp, and seeing a good many strange faces with his acquaintances, who were prisoners, Keener said: "Hey, boys, you seem to have a good many prisoners." The Whigs, by his speech, knew he was a Tory, and were going to shoot him and his companions, but Captain McKissick interfered, and by earnest appeal saved their lives.

    Adam Reep, as part of the history of the battle was accustomed to tell that the Tories took all his cattle, including his bull, and drove them to their camp; that when the firing began the Tories soon began to pass his house, which was some three miles away, and it was not long before "old John" appeared in the procession bellowing: "Lib-er-ty! Lib-er-ty!! Liber-ty!!!"

    There was no official report of the battle, consequently the exact number of casualties was never known. The badge of the Tories was a green pine twig in the hat. In the heat of battle some of these would fall out and others were thrown away, so that it could not be told to which side many belonged.

    Fifty-six dead lay on the face of the ridge, up and down which the forces advanced and retreated. Thirteen of these were of Captain Sharpe's Fourth Creek (Statesville) Company. Many bodies lay scattered over the hill. The killed were seventy or more, forty of whom were Whigs. The wounded were one hundred on each side, some of whom afterwards died from their wounds. Among the Whigs killed were Captains Dobson, Falls, Armstrong, Smith, Sloan and Bowman. Captains McKissick and Houston were wounded. Some of the Whigs wore a piece of white paper in their hats as a badge. Several of them were shot through the head. Many of the dead were buried on the field. Wives, mothers, daughters and other kindred of the contestants came that afternoon and next morning to inquire for their friends. As they discovered them among the dead and dying, there were heart-rending scenes of distress and grief. Mrs. Falls came twenty-five miles on horseback, accompanied by her negro cook. Finding her gallant husband dead, she obtained a quilt from Mrs. Reinhardt, whose husband lived near the battleground, and carried his body across Sherrill's Ford and buried it with his kindred.

    The troops engaged, except Reep of Lincoln, and Major [David] Wilson, Captains Knox and Smith of Mecklenburg, were from (what to 1777 had been) Rowan County. The officers' surnames were found among the militia officers of the county in the proceedings of the "Committee of Safety," of which many of them were members. Captain John Hardin's beat was along Lord Granville's line from Silver Creek in Burke to South Fork, and from these. two points to the Catawba River. Captain Joseph Dobson was within its bounds. Much the largest portion of the troops was from what is now Iredell County. Captain John Sloan was from Fourth Creek. I do not think all who are mentioned as captains held that position at this time; some may have been prior to and some became so afterward. No account was written until forty years had elapsed. There seems to have been but few commands given in the engagement; officers and privates acted as occasion required, and both suffered severely.>

    This was a battle between the ancestors of the North Carolina Confederate soldier, and taking armament and surroundings into consideration, is about a sample of what would have been witnessed in North Carolina in I861-'65 if those who believed the proper course to pursue for redress of wrongs was to "fight in the Union" had refused to fight outside, or if Pettigrew's and Cooke's forces had been pitted against Lane's and McRae's.

    Tradition says Locke's men got some liquor at "Dellinger's Tavern" as they were going into the fight. This tavern stood on the present Robinson block in Lincolnton. At that time Henry Dellinger kept a tavern seven miles from Lincolnton at a cross-road, where John B. Smith now lives. It was probably Rutherford's men en-route to the battlefield who "took courage" at Dellinger's Tavern.


    IMPORTANCE OF THE BATTLE.

    This battle is but little known in history, yet is one of the most important in results and best fought of the Revolution. King's Mountain and Ramsaur's Mill at that time were both in Lincoln County, and not twenty miles apart. If Moore had obeyed Lord Cornwallis, and delayed organization until Ferguson advanced, he could have re-inforced him with two thousand men. If the Whigs had been defeated matters would have been in even worse condition. Ramsaur's Mill was the first and most important "act" in King's Mountain. It destroyed Toryism in that section and caused Bryan, with his followers, to leave the "forks of the Yadkin" and not return until Cornwallis came. The Dutch, as they had kept the oath to King George, kept their "parole" to the American cause. Cornwallis marched through this country the following January and camped at Ramsaur's Mill. He lost more by desertion than he gained in recruits. When he was here, Morgan passed the present site of Maiden, nine miles distant, and for five days was not twenty miles from him. A messenger on any of these days would have enabled Cornwallis to place his army between Morgan and the Catawba River. I do not think, in killed and wounded, in proportion to numbers engaged, the battle is equalled in the Revolution. Forty killed and one hundred wounded, out of four hundred engaged, is high class, even in Confederate annals. The defeat and rout of three times their number is certainly worthy of note. No attempt has been made to preserve the features of this battle-ground; to-day it is tilled by the plow of the farmer, and but slight mementoes of the battle can be seen. On the highest point of the ridge is a head-stone marking three Tory graves. One at the foot of the hill marks another. A brick wall near where the severest fighting was done contains the remains of Captain Dobson where he fell; also the remains of his daughter and her husband, Wallace Alexander, who were buried beside him some years after the Revolution. The battle-field is within the corporate limits of Lincolnton.


    AFTER THE BATTLE.

    General Rutherford remained here two days, sending Davie's Cavalry and other troops through the country arresting Tories who were nearly all "paroled" a few who had committed serious depredations being sent to Salisbury jail to await trial at next term of court. Being informed that Colonel Bryan, the noted Tory, had organized his forces in the "forks of the Yadkin" he determined to give him attention. On mustering his troops, he found he had only two hundred men of the sixteen hundred present two days before. This is a fair sample of the conduct of the Mecklenburg and Rowan in the Revolution. They would answer all calls to fight, hut when the battle was over, or while preparation was being made, they declined to undergo the wearisomeness of camp-life. General Rutherford did not, as would be done now, send details to bring the absentees back, but sent messengers ahead along the road he would march, and before he reached the vicinity of Bryan he had six hundred men. Bryan immediately fled, and most of Rutherford's men sought their fire-sides-this time by his permission.

Mary (?)

F, b. 28 September 1736, d. November 1794
  • Last Edited: 25 Feb 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: 28 September 1736
  • (Bride) Marriage*: circa 1756; Groom=James Stewart
  • Married Name: circa 1756; Stewart
  • (Deceased) Death*: November 1794; Georgia
  • Research Note*: 25 February 2019; Others think this Mary was Mary McEwen, but this writer has seen no evidence of this in the records of Rowan county, NC. It seems quite unlikely that Mary was from some New England McEwen family, as some have speculated.1

Family: James Stewart b. 24 Dec 1723, d. 17 Feb 1817

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Benjamin L. Halsey

M, b. circa 1785, d. circa 1845
  • Last Edited: 7 May 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1785; Georgia; The 1880 census for Benjamin's daughter Mary is the only indication we currently have for Benjamin's birth place. It seems questionable, whether Martha knew where her father was born, or not. He would have been born 95 years before the 1880 census was recorded. He was probably born in South Carolina.

    It is possible that his father, George Holsell, may have moved to Georgia, and then moved back to South Carolina, as a George "Wholsell" was on the 1790 Tax Digest in Wilkes County, which may be too early to have been George Holsey / Halsey Jr.1
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 10 February 1809; Jefferson Co., Georgia; Bride=Martha Kennedy
  • (head of family) 1820 Census*: 7 August 1820; Jefferson Co., Georgia2
  • (head of family) 1830 Census*: 1 June 1830; Monroe Co., Georgia3
  • (head of family) 1840 Census*: 1 June 1840; Chambers Co., Alabama4
  • (Deceased) Death*: circa 1845; Chambers Co., Alabama
  • Biography*: Benjamin L. Halsey was born about 1785, and his daughter Mary, on the 1880 census, thought he was born in Georgia. In 1809 he married Martha Kennedy in Jefferson Co. GA. In Nov 1810, as a resident of Jefferson Co. GA, he sold Lot 150 in the 18th District of Jasper Co. GA to George W. Hardwick, also of Jefferson (Jasper Co. DB 5:205-7). The lot was originally granted to Joseph Dickey of Screven Co. GA in the 1807 Land Lottery. The deed from Dickey to Halsey has not been found.

    Benjamin was on the tax digests in Jefferson Co. with the same 136 acres of land from 1811 until 1822. His land was on Duhart Creek, which is about four or so miles NW of Louisville, GA. His wife's father, John Kennedy, owned land on Blackjack Branch, which is about two or so miles east of Louisville.

    The 1820 census of Jefferson Co. shows Benjamin aged 26-45, his wife over 45 (possibly an error). There was also a daughter under ten, four sons under 15, and one other male aged 16-18. Living next door was William Lyon, and next to him, William Clark, who had witnessed the dower's relinquishment for the 1810 deed above.

    Benjamin was in Wigham's District of Jefferson Co. in 1821 when he won Lot 62 in the Second District of Monroe Co., later Pike. In Dec 1822 he bought Lot 104 in the Eleventh District of Monroe Co. from Nathaniel Frasher for only $30 (Monroe Co. DB C-35). Frasher and Halsey were neighbors in Wigham's District.

    Frasher had won this lot in the 1821 Land Lottery. A Jeremiah Halsey married Sarah Fraser, Oct 24 1831, in Chatham Co, GA. Jeremiah's relation to Benjamin, if any, is unknown. Jeremiah was in 1850 Duvall Co, FL, age 40, born in Ireland about 1810. He was a widower with two daughters, Margaret, ten, and Mary, eight, both born in Florida.

    Benjamin was still listed in the 1823 Tax Digest in Jefferson Co., but only owned land in Monroe Co. Apparently he moved that year to Monroe Co., as he is not listed in Jefferson Co. in 1824. In 1825, now a resident of Monroe Co., he sold his lot in Pike Co. (Pike Co. DB B-330).

    He and his wife were in Monroe Co. for the 1830 census, both aged 40-50. Six others in the home were a male in his twenties, daughters 15- 20 and 5-10, and three sons under 15. In Dec 1831 Benjamin sold the west part of Lot 104 in the 11th District to Seaborn Hixson of Upson Co. Witnesses were John Walton and James Lyon.

    By 1832 Benjamin had moved to Troup County. In Jan 1832 Sampson D. Harrison of Troup Co. sold to Benjamin L. Halsey of Monroe Co., for $500, Lot 117 in the 12th District of Troup. The 12th District was in the northern part of the county. A Benjamin Halsey, perhaps a son, was a witness to this deed. This Benjamin signed with a "W."

    A Benjamin "W" Holsey of McGehee's Dist. in Troup Co. won Lot 61 in District 2 of Section 3 in the 1832 Gold Lottery. Thomas Holsey of Haralson's District in Troup won Lot 144 in District 5 of Section 1.

    In November 1838 Benjamin bought the SW quarter of Sec. 9 in R28E, T24N, a mile east of Standing Rock in Chambers Co. AL (Fed. Land Cert. #7208). He was 50-60 on the 1840 Chambers Co. census, his wife, 40-50. Others at home included a male 15-20, two males 20-30, a female 10-15. This latter was perhaps Mary J. Halsey, who married James F. Thomas in Chambers Co. in 1841, with Lewis Halsey as witness. Benjamin apparently died in Chambers Co. sometime before 1850.
  • Research Note: 3 September 2012; The Halsey family of SC, and of Pike County, GA, was originally part of the Halsell family, and is no relation to the Halsey family of Long Island, NY.

    The Halsell / Halsall family is thought to descend from Sir Henry Halsall (1483-1522) of Halsall, Lancastershire, England. His ancestry can be traced back to the 1200's.

    DNA evidence connects the American and English Halsell / Halsall families. And DNA evidence from Kenneth Halsey of Chambers County, AL, a descendant of George Halsey / Halsell Jr., connects this Halsey family to the Halsell line.

    In 1885, this Halsey family was contacted by the author of a book on the New York Halseys, and ever since then, they have thought that they were descendants of the New York Halseys. However, this has been proven not to be the case. The family appears as an unconnected line in the book on the Halsey family of Long Island, and indeed, they are unconnected.; Principal=Thomas Halsell5,6
  • Research Note: 7 May 2019; Benjamin did not leave a will or estate in Chambers County, but I can only assume that he died there. There are few if any stone markers in the county dating back that far, so I don’t know where he is buried, or his date of death. It is possible that he moved away with one of his daughters, I just don’t know. I don’t currently have 1850 census records either for his daughter Elizabeth, or for the other daughter, Mary. I do know that Mary was in Coosa Co. AL by 1860, so I guess it is possible that Benjamin L. Halsey died in Coosa rather than Chambers.

    I don’t know if Benjamin appears in Chambers Co. land records, other than his original purchase of land in Chambers from the Federal Government. It would be instructive to know what became of this parcel of land after his death. In fact, this might be the one avenue of research that would help us prove the names of one or more of his descendants.

    As for the ancestry of Benjamin L. Halsey, based on autosomal DNA evidence from the AncestryDNA test, he seems to have been a son of George Halsey / Holsell Sr. of Fairfield District, SC. Some of the family of George Halsey Jr. (a proven son of George Sr.) settled in Chambers Co. AL, where Benjamin ended up as well. This Benjamin has autosomal matches to the two daughters of Benjamin Sr. who married Lockwoods / Lockards.

    This South Carolina family used the spelling of Halsell, which most branches still retain. They are distinct from the Halsey family of New York, which descends from Thomas Halsey (1591 – 1679). At least one branch of the New York family moved to Chowan Co. NC, with descendants later in northern Alabama. The name Benjamin occurs in this family as well, but I’ve never found a connection between them and our Benjamin L.

    I have also looked at the possibility that Benjamin L. came directly from England or Ireland to Georgia. There was in fact a Jeremiah Halsey in early Georgia (later Florida) who was born in Ireland in 1810, according to census records. Jeremiah married a Frasier, a name which was also associated with Benjamin in early Jefferson Co. GA. But autosomal DNA records clearly associate Benjamin L. with the Halsell family of SC.6

Family: Martha Kennedy b. b 1786, d. c 1845

Citations

  1. [S1880] 1880 Census, Benson, Chilton, Alabama; Roll: 6; Family History Film: 1254006; Page: 38D; Enumeration District: 028; Image: 0524.

    Name:     James T. Thomas
    Age:     63
    Birth Year:     abt 1817
    Birthplace:     South Carolina
    Home in 1880:     Benson, Chilton, Alabama
    Race:     White
    Gender:     Male
    Relation to Head of House:     Self (Head)
    Marital Status:     Married
    Spouse's Name:     Mary J. Thomas
    Father's Birthplace:     North Carolina
    Mother's Birthplace:     South Carolina
    Occupation:     Farmer

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    James T. Thomas     63
    Mary J. Thomas     52 (both parents born in Georgia)
    John C. Thomas     26
    Mary J. Thomas     23
    Susan Thomas     21
    James L. Thomas     19
    Rocksy Thomas     10.
  2. [S1820] 1820 Census, Jefferson, Georgia, Page: 36; NARA Roll: M33_10; Image: 30.

    Name:     Benjamin L Halsey
    County:     Jefferson
    State:     Georgia
    Enumeration Date:     August 7, 1820
    Free White Males - Under 10:     3
    Free White Males - 10 thru 15:     1
    Free White Males - 16 thru 18:     1
    Free White Males - 16 thru 25:     1
    Free White Males - 26 thru 44:     1
    Free White Females - Under 10:     1
    Free White Females - 45 and over:     1
    Number of Persons - Engaged in Agriculture:     1
    Free White Persons - Under 16:     5
    Free White Persons - Over 25:     2
    Total Free White Persons:     8
    Total All Persons - White, Slaves, Colored, Other:     8.
  3. [S1830] 1830, Census, Monroe, Georgia, Page: 193; NARA Roll: M19-19; Family History Film: 0007039.

    Name:     Benjamin L Halsey
    Home in 1830:      , Monroe, Georgia

    Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9:     2
    Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14:     1
    Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29:     1
    Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49:     1
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9:     1
    Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19:     1
    Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49:     1
    Free White Persons - Under 20:     5
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49:     3
    Total Free White Persons:     8
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):     8.
  4. [S1840] 1840, Census, Chambers, Alabama; Roll: 2; Page: 219; Image: 448; Family History Library Film: 0002332.

    Name:     Benjamen Holsey
    [Benjamin Halsey]
    County:     Chambers
    State:     Alabama
    Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19:     1
    Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29:     2
    Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59:     1
    Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14:     1
    Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49:     1
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Free Colored, Slaves):     6
    Persons Employed in Agriculture:     1
    Free White Persons - Under 20:     2
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49:     3
    Total Free White Persons:     6
    Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves:     6.
  5. [S447] Tom Howland e-mail, e-mail address, Jun 2005 -- 2011,.
  6. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Martha Kennedy

F, b. before 1786, d. circa 1845
  • Last Edited: 25 Aug 2018

Family: Benjamin L. Halsey b. c 1785, d. c 1845

Citations

  1. [S1807] Jr The Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, The Second or 1807 Land Lottery of Georgia, p. 109, Martha had to have been a spinster over 21 years old to have participated in the 1807 Lottery.

John Kennedy

M, b. circa 1760, d. 1822
  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2004
  • Biography*:      John Kennedy's early life has not been adequately researched. But evidence suggests that he may have been living in colonial Georgia prior to the Revolutionary War. In 1806 he was living on 251 acres granted to him on Blackjack Branch in Jefferson County, GA. The date of the grant is not currently known, but the land was two or more miles east of Louisville, GA. This area was in Burke County, GA prior to 1796. Burke County was formed in 1777, and the jurisdiction prior to 1777 was St. George's Parish. St. George's Parish extended all the way from the South Carolina border on the east to the Ogeechee River, which was just west of Louisville. The Savannah River formed the border with South Carolina, and Orangeburg District was on the other side of the river. In the late 1780's this area became Winton District, and after 1798, it was Barnwell District. Perhaps John's family had come to Georgia from this nearby area in South Carolina.      

    John may have been the John Kennedy who was mentioned as a nephew in Darby Kennedy's will, in 1777, in St. George's Parish (Abstracts of the Colonial Wills of GA 1733-1777 by Willard E. Wight, p. 74). In 1760 a Daniel Kennedy bought 100 acres in St. George's Parish from Thomas Leitch (Abstracts of Colonial GA Bk. J, 1755-1762, by George Fuller Walker, p. 190).      A John Kennedy was mentioned in a "Composite List of Oglethorpe's Soldiers and Settlers." The name John Kennedy is found both in a list of an "Independent Company, 1749-1764," and in a list of the "Highland Independent Company, Darien." This John (whether one man or several) had grants in St. Paul, Queensborough, and St. George, in 1758, 1764, and 1769 (Colonial Soldiers of the South, 1732-1774, by Murtie June Clark, p. 979, 985). Perhaps this John was a brother or nephew of the Darby Kennedy mentioned above.      

    A John Kennedy fought in the Revolutionary War. His name appears in a list of Revolutionary War Soldiers from Queensborough, as found in a manuscript by J. A. LeConte in the Rare Book and Manuscript Section, University of GA Library (as mentioned in Ancestoring Through Weekly Newspaper Columns, by Jeanne & C. W. Stephens, p. 45, column #57).      In 1784, a John Kennedy was granted 287.5 acres in Washington County, GA, on Buffalo Creek. Buffalo Creek runs through current day Washington and Hancock Counties.      

    A John Kennedy died in 1798 in Columbia County, GA. This John mentioned both a son and a grandson named John, and the John Kennedy of Jefferson County did indeed have a son named John, who could have been the grandson of this John who died in 1798. Further research is needed.      

    This writer has not yet determined whether or not any of these references refer to the John Kennedy of Jefferson County, GA.      The father of John Kennedy of Jefferson County may also have been named John, but this has not been proven. The idea that John's father was also named John is supported by a 1796 record which lists John Kennedy, "Jr." as a juror in Jefferson County.      

    John Kennedy was mentioned as a juror in Jefferson County in 1796 and was also a grand juror there in 1799. This would suggest that he was an established resident of the Burke / Jefferson County area and not a recent arrival.      John appears on Jefferson County, GA Tax Digest in 1806, and owned 251 acres "granted to same" adjoining Spires on Blackjack Branch, as mentioned previously. John won land in Wilkinson County in the 1807 Land Lottery, as did his "spinster" daughters Jane and Martha and his son William.      

    John left a will in Jefferson County, dated September 1, 1821, and probated January 9, 1822. He left bequests to his son Thomas of Twiggs County; his granddaughter, Margaret Bell Kenedy; his daughter Jane (described as a "lunatic"); his son John; his daughter Martha, wife of Benjamin Halsey; the orphans of his deceased son Francis; his son William; and his daughter Mary, wife of Daniel McNeely. His son Thomas was the executor. Witnesses were R. Gamble, Hugh Alexander, and David Alexander.1
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1760
  • (Deceased) Death*: 1822; Jefferson Co., Georgia

Family:

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Margery Margaret Strickland

F, b. 26 May 1840, d. 29 January 1915
  • Last Edited: 11 Nov 2003

Family: Martin Van Buren Hudson b. 4 Jan 1837, d. 30 Aug 1909

Citations

  1. [S1860] 1860, Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Southern Division, Randolph, Alabama; Roll: M653_22; Page: 678; Family History Library Film: 803022

    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Margaret Strickland      61
    David L Strickland      27
    Madison Strickland      18
    Jefferson Strickland      18
    Margaret M Strickland      20
    Henry A Strickland      16
    George W Strickland      22.

Martin Van Buren Hudson

M, b. 4 January 1837, d. 30 August 1909
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Margery Margaret Strickland b. 26 May 1840, d. 29 Jan 1915

Julius Lee Strickland

M, b. 29 August 1875, d. 11 December 1932
  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2012

Family 1: Mattie Carrie Wallace b. 20 Aug 1880, d. 27 Nov 1920

Family 2: Mattie Lou Hall b. 13 Aug 1883, d. 8 Mar 1969

Citations

  1. [S1880] 1880 Census, Hickory Flat, Chambers, Alabama; Roll: 5; Family History Film: 1254005; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 016; Image: 0233.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Henry Strickland     36
    Julia Strickland     34
    Lenarah Strickland     11
    Derah Strickland     11
    Ollie Strickland     8
    Julias Strickland     4
    Minnie Strickland     2.
  2. [S1910] 1910 Federal Census, , Robertson Crossroads, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: T624_28; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 0106; ; FHL microfilm: 1374041.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Julius Strickland     32
    Carrie Strickland     27
    Hollie Strickland     5
    Horace Strickland     4
    Wallace Strickland     2.
  3. [S1920] 1920 Federal Census, , Capitol Heights, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: T625_37; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 134; Image: 402.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Julius L Strickland     44
    Carrie Strickland     39
    Hollie L Strickland     16
    Horace Strickland     14
    Wallace Strickland     8
    Allie Strickland     6.
  4. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesty of James Maurice Griffin.
  5. [S1930] 1930 Federal Census, , Montgomery, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: 43; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 32; Image: 1129.0; FHL microfilm: 2339778.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    J L Strickland     49
    Mattie Lou Strickland     38
    Mary Alice Strickland     7
    Kathleen Strickland     4
    Maxwell Strickland     2.

Mattie Carrie Wallace

F, b. 20 August 1880, d. 27 November 1920
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Julius Lee Strickland b. 29 Aug 1875, d. 11 Dec 1932

Citations

  1. [S1910] 1910 Federal Census, , Robertson Crossroads, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: T624_28; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 0106; ; FHL microfilm: 1374041.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Julius Strickland     32
    Carrie Strickland     27
    Hollie Strickland     5
    Horace Strickland     4
    Wallace Strickland     2.
  2. [S1920] 1920 Federal Census, , Capitol Heights, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: T625_37; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 134; Image: 402.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Julius L Strickland     44
    Carrie Strickland     39
    Hollie L Strickland     16
    Horace Strickland     14
    Wallace Strickland     8
    Allie Strickland     6.

Mattie Lou Hall

F, b. 13 August 1883, d. 8 March 1969
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Julius Lee Strickland b. 29 Aug 1875, d. 11 Dec 1932

Mary Alice Strickland

F, b. 12 July 1922, d. 16 June 2010
  • Last Edited: 17 Dec 2017
  • (Resident) Residence*: Macomb, McDonough Co., Illinois
  • (Child) Birth*: 12 July 1922; Montgomery, Montgomery Co., Alabama
  • (Bride) Marriage*: 15 December 1943; Good Hope, McDonough Co., Illinois; Groom=Keith Duane Mansir
  • Married Name: 15 December 1943; Mansir
  • Death*: 16 June 2010; Macomb, McDonough Co., Illinois1
  • Obituary*: 19 June 2010; Mary A. Mansir, age 87, of Macomb, Ill., passed away at 5:50 p.m. Wednesday, June 16, 2010, at McDonough District Hospital in Macomb.
    She was born July 12, 1922, in Montgomery, Ala., to J.L. and Matti Lou Hall Strickland. Mary was united in marriage on Dec. 15, 1943, in Good Hope, Ill., to Keith D. Mansir. He preceded her in death, on Nov. 9, 2006, along with one daughter, Kay Lynn Frye; and brothers and sisters, Horace, Kathlene, Aileen, Walace, Rene, Max and Holee.
    Surviving to mourn her passing are one son, Duane and his wife, Dale Mansir, of Colchester; one daughter, Debra Mansir of St. Charles, Mo.; and grandchildren, Capt. Kane and his wife, Capt. Krista Mansir, of Fort Bragg, N.C., Sara Frye and Alex Mansir.
    Mary had worked at Scripps Reno and Spurgeons in Macomb, and Kay's Fashions in Bushnell.
    She was a member of the Calvary Baptist Church in Macomb.
    Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Monday, June 21, 2010, at the Jones Mortuary in Colchester, with the Rev. Cody Smith officiating. Visitation with the family will be 9:30 to 11 a.m. Monday, June 21, 2010, at the funeral home. Friends may view and sign the register book at the funeral home after 9 a.m. Sunday, until time of services. Burial will take place in Good Hope Cemetery.1

Family: Keith Duane Mansir b. 7 Jan 1922, d. 9 Nov 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Obituary of Mary Mansir, published in Peoria Journal Star on June 19, 2010.

Keith Duane Mansir

M, b. 7 January 1922, d. 9 November 2006
  • Last Edited: 16 Sep 2007

Family: Mary Alice Strickland b. 12 Jul 1922, d. 16 Jun 2010

Citations

  1. [S2] Social Security Death Records,.

Horace Masely Strickland

M, b. 4 September 1905, d. 26 December 1981
  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2012

Family: Ethel Whatley b. s 1913

Citations

  1. [S1910] 1910 Federal Census, , Robertson Crossroads, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: T624_28; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 0106; ; FHL microfilm: 1374041.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Julius Strickland     32
    Carrie Strickland     27
    Hollie Strickland     5
    Horace Strickland     4
    Wallace Strickland     2.
  2. [S1920] 1920 Federal Census, , Capitol Heights, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: T625_37; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 134; Image: 402.

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    Julius L Strickland     44
    Carrie Strickland     39
    Hollie L Strickland     16
    Horace Strickland     14
    Wallace Strickland     8
    Allie Strickland     6.
  3. [S1900] 1900 Federal census, , Athens, Clarke, Georgia; Roll: T627_656; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 29-8.

    Name:     H M Strickland
    Age:     34
    Estimated Birth Year:     abt 1906
    Gender:     Male
    Race:     White
    Birthplace:     Georgia
    Marital Status:     Married
    Relation to Head of House:     Head
    Home in 1940:     Athens, Clarke, Georgia
    Street:     Milledge Hite
    House Number:     Apt 115
    Farm:     No
    Inferred Residence in 1935:     Virginia
    Residence in 1935:     Virginia
    Sheet Number:     5A
    Number of Household in Order of Visitation:     97
    Occupation:     Labor Foreman
    House Owned or Rented:     Rented
    Value of Home or Monthly Rental if Rented:     20
    Attended School or College:     No
    Highest Grade Completed:     Elementary school, 8th grade
    Hours Worked Week Prior to Census:     48
    Class of Worker:     Wage or salary worker in private work
    Weeks Worked in 1939:     52
    Income:     2340
    Income Other Sources:     No

    Household Members:     
    Name     Age
    H M Strickland     34
    Ethel W Strickland.
  4. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesty of Horace Strickland.

Lloyd Strickland

M, b. circa 1807, d. 1897
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000
  • Biography*: Lloyd Strickland was born about 1807 in Jackson Co. GA. He married Eliza Holmes in Troup Co. GA in 1835. He was on the 1840 census in Heard Co., and the 1850 census in Randolph Co. According to tradition the move from Heard to Randolph was because of problems with the Indians stealing horses. About six months prior to the Civil War, Lloyd and family moved to the vicinity of Windham Springs in northern Tuscaloosa County, AL. According to family tradition, they had intended to continue on to Texas. But while they were encamped here to rest and to rest their stock, there came a deep snow, and by the time it had melted and the weather had cleared, they decided to stay where they were. Lloyd homesteaded 360 acres about five miles from Windham Springs. Lloyd's son, William, served in the Civil War. William contracted a fever and died in the service. But Lloyd was a supporter of the Union cause. He filed a successful damage claim after the War, with the Southern Claims Commission (Case #18765), which mentions a number of details. Lloyd testified that for six months during the latter part of the rebellion, he fed and protected his son Lloyd, Jr., and five other young men, who were all "lying out to escape the conscript law." Lloyd, Jr., who was age 18 in 1864, had apparently been drafted into the Confederate Army against his will, and then deserted. Prior to 1870, Lloyd Sr. bought a farm in Fayette County, about 16 miles from Windham Springs, near the town of Berry. He was in the 1870 and 1880 censuses of Fayette Co. AL, and died there in 1897. Both Lloyd and his wife are buried at the Mt. Joy / Alta Cemetery, at Cedar Creek Baptist Church.
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1807; Jackson Co., Georgia
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 17 December 1835; Troup Co., Georgia; Bride=Eliza Holmes
  • (Deceased) Death*: 1897; Fayette Co., Alabama

Family: Eliza Holmes b. c 1817, d. 1888

Eliza Holmes

F, b. circa 1817, d. 1888
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Lloyd Strickland b. c 1807, d. 1897

Calvin Strickland

M, b. 3 April 1803, d. 11 May 1865
  • Last Edited: 22 Nov 2013
  • (Child) Birth*: 3 April 1803; Abbeville District, South Carolina
  • (Groom) Marriage*: circa 1834; Georgia; Bride=Sarah (?)
  • (Deceased) Death*: 11 May 1865; Randolph Co., Alabama1
  • Biography*: Calvin Strickland was born about 1803 in Abbeville District, SC. He was probably in Jackson Co. GA between 1807-1824. By 1826 he was in Fayette Co. GA, and appears on the tax digest there that year, as agent for Horatio G. Strickland. He paid taxes on Lot 179 in the 7th District of Fayette Co. He does not appear on the 1830 census in GA, but by 1832 he was in Campbell Co. GA. He won land that year in the Land Lottery, Lot 241 in the 23rd District of Cherokee Co. In 1834 he sold the lot to Larkin Strickland. (Cherokee Co. DB) Calvin married Sarah about 1833, Sarah's last name is not known and the marriage record has not been found. The marriage probably took place in Heard Co. GA or in Randolph Co. AL. Both counties have lost most early records due to fire. Sarah was born in 1815 in GA. Calvin was on the 1840 census of Randolph Co. AL. The listing does not appear to be accurate, as it does not list his three sons, nor does it give his age correctly. An elderly couple was in the household that year, probably Sarah's parents. In 1848 Calvin bought land in Section 17 of T22S R10E in Randolph Co. That is about three miles east of Malone, AL in the SW part of the county. It is not clear whether he lived on this land or not. (Federal Land Records, Cert. #10380) Calvin was on both the 1850 census and 1860 census in Randolph Co. and gave his occupation as wagon maker.

Family: Sarah (?) b. c 1815

Citations

  1. [S46] Batson, Grace Waldrop of Naples, FL,.

Sarah (?)

F, b. circa 1815
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Calvin Strickland b. 3 Apr 1803, d. 11 May 1865