Joseph B. Daniel1

M, b. circa 1797, d. 1847
  • Last Edited: 12 May 2019

Family: Matilda J. Windham b. s 1801, d. a 1 Jun 1840

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    Source of the middle initial is unknown. If correct, maybe it stood for "Barnes."
  2. [S1] See: https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/18212183/person/19638135877/facts
    No primary source for this marriage has been found.
  3. [S1830] 1830, Census, 1830; Census Place: District 6, Edgecombe, North Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 120; Page: 284; Family History Library Film: 0018086

    Name:      Joseph Daniel
    Home in 1830 (City, County, State):      District 6, Edgecombe, North Carolina
    Free White Persons - Males - Under 5:      3
    Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14:      1
    Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29:      1
    Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23:      2
    Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23:      1
    Free White Persons - Under 20:      5
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49:      2
    Total Free White Persons:      7
    Total Slaves:      3
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):      10.
  4. [S1840] 1840, Census, Year: 1840; Census Place: Sumter, Alabama; Roll: 15; Page: 81; Family History Library
    Film: 0002335

    Name:      Joseph Daniel
    Home in 1840 (City, County, State):      Sumter, Alabama
    Free White Persons - Males - Under 5:      3
    Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9:      1
    Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14:      1
    Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19:      1
    Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9:      1
    Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39:      1
    Slaves - Females - 55 thru 99:      1
    Free White Persons - Under 20:      7
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49:      2
    Total Free White Persons:      9
    Total Slaves:      1
    Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves:      10.
  5. [S1] https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/66761061/person/32173067072/facts.

Edwin Daniel

M, b. circa 1794, d. say 1814
  • Last Edited: 12 Nov 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1794; Edgecombe Co., North Carolina
  • (Deceased) Death*: say 1814; Edgecombe Co., North Carolina; Edwin may have died around 1814 in Edgecombe County, because shortly thereafter, his sister Millicent named a son Edwin, apparently to preserved his memory. No record of Edwin Barnes has been found after his mention in his father's 1805 estate.1

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Levi Daniel1

M, b. circa 1796, d. 1853
  • Last Edited: 12 May 2019

Family: Sally (?) b. s 1798

Citations

  1. [S105] Michael and Corky Swanson, of Abilene, TX (e-mail address), see web site (1999) at http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/w/a/Mary-E-Swanson/index.html,.
  2. [S1850] 1850, Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: Anderson, Clark, Arkansas; Roll: M432_25; Page: 189A; Image: 378

    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Levi Daniel      53
    Sally Daniel      47
    Levi Daniel      21
    Sally Ann Daniel      19
    Thomas Daniel      23
    Julia Ann Daniel      7
    Henry Daniel      24
    Frances Daniel      19.
  3. [S1] https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/151721349/person/312010670052/facts.

Elizabeth White

F, b. 29 December 1673, d. 1 February 1729
  • Last Edited: 19 Jan 2019

Family 1: James Davis b. c 1670, d. 14 Feb 1716

Family 2: James 'Jeams' Newby b. c 1670

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p. 124.
  2. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.172.
  3. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.152.
  4. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p. 107 "Elizabeth Newby, 2nd w. of Jeams & dt. Henry White, d. 12-1-1728, aged about 55 yrs."

William Davis

M, b. circa 1635
  • Last Edited: 20 May 2008
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1635; Warrosquyoake Co., Virginia
  • Biography*: The only reference to William in the Pasquotank Monthly Meeting was as the father of Jeams Davis who married Elezabeath White in 1690 (Hinshaw, p.137).
  • Research Note*: From Irvine Davis, May 2008:

    I have always been doubtful about William's wife Sarah being a Jarvis. I have never been able to find out how this idea originated. Now I am even skeptical about his wife being Sarah. It seems that naming William's wife as Sary (or Sarah) is based on the mistaken idea that William and Sary Davis were witnesses at the marriage of Timothy Meaids and Anne Blessing at Pasquotank, NC, in 1677. Both Hinshaw and Gwen Boyer Bjorkman in her compilation of Quaker marriage certificates list the witnesses at this marriage and nothing is said about either William or Sary Davis. The names given are William and Sary Travis. While Travis could be a mistake for Davis, this is highly unlikely.
    Bjorkman gives William and Sary Travis also as witnesses to the marriage of Solloman Poole and Margrete White in 1679 and the marriage of Zacarias Nixon and Elezabeth Page in 1681.
    There is good evidence that there was a William Travis in Pasquotank, NC, at that time. RootsWeb entries give a lot of information about a William Travis who came from Ireland, married Sarah West and ended up first in Virginia and then Pasquotank, NC. While I can't guarantee the accuracy of all this, I think that the evidence is good that William Travis did exists and that he and his wife Sary were the witnesses at the Quaker marriages in Pasquotank.
    Another matter that I have wondered about is whether or not William Davis ever lived in Pasquotank, NC. It is generally assumed that he did but that he had died before his son Jame's marriage, since he doesn't appear there as a witness. The fact that he wasn't at his son's wedding may mean that he was still back in Virginia or wherever James came from.
    There is a document that indicates that when James recieved an allotment of land in North Carolina, several persons that he had brought with him were included, including a William Davis. This may have been a brother. It doesn't seem likely that he would be responsible for the "transporticon" of his father.1
  • Research Note: Richard Dietz thinks William Davis's parents were Samuel Davis I of Gravesend, Kent, England, and Elizabeth Benton. See his website at: http://www.gwest.org/ and his book on this family.2

Family:

Citations

  1. [S360] Irvine Davis e-mail, e-mail address, May 2008,.
  2. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Henry White III

M, b. 1642, d. 3 August 1712
  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2018
  • (Child) Birth*: 1642; Virginia
  • (Groom) Marriage*: say 1668; North Carolina; Bride=Mary (?)
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 10 September 1681; Perquimans Pct, North Carolina; Bride=Damaris Page1
  • Letter Text*: say 1698; Pasquotank Pct., North Carolina; A poem by Henry White, 1698:

    A few words conserning the fall of man: and how thay wente from god in the fall and allsoe conserning the restoration by Christ Jesus and his glorious aperance: and some holsom exhortations for everyone to take notis of wrighten in verse by one who hath love in his harte to all mankind and desirs and breath in his harte and soule that all may come to the knowleg of god: and known by the name of this 11 day of the 3 month 1698 henry white
    help Lord the godly doth decay
    thy presepts for to obeay
    thy aid I supplicate
    the wikeds prid for to abate
    and bring it down with speed
    and eke thy cheldren feed
    thy tender babs to carry one
    by vertue of thy onely Sone
    who thou hast sent for those
    that dont thy light opose
    and that obediant are
    to thee with godly fere
    thou with them then delever
    and keep ther souls forever
    but for the wiked thy soul doth hate
    ther actions all abomynate
    and will my soul doth know
    be honored in ther overthtow
    if that they dont with speed repent
    and com to Crist whom thou hast sent
    into the world a blesed light
    to open the blind eye and giving sight
    to them that loves and knows it cheks
    all heden sins it reprove and corects
    all that will com and him obeay
    he will with sions robe him sure aray
    and take away all that will hender
    thy body soule and speireit will make tender
    and make the feest for habitation
    as it was in the first creation
    before that man did fall by sin
    or any temtation did begine
    then did god see that all was good
    that he had maid as it then stood
    in trew obediance all yt god had maid
    were in the power and him obeayed
    thuse the creation stode as it may tell to thee
    and all things answered well in swet harmonee
    the will of god was trewly then obeaid
    and all things in the power that god had maid
    untell the serpent the sutelest of all
    that god had maid both great and small
    begone to temt the woman as wee see
    to eat the frute of the forbeden tree
    and tould her it would make her wise
    to understand in opening of her eise
    and she shuld be as god to knowe
    the good and evell here belowe
    thuse she obeayed and wente from god
    and did procure the allinated Rode
    of his displeseur because of sin
    Which did involve mankind ther in
    for a dam did obeay his wife
    and soe he lost his enasent life
    because thay both were well agreed
    the frute to ploke and therone feed
    then forthwith entered in the shame
    and fere for to behould the lord in came
    and hiding from this presence who all things sees
    in paradize amonst the garden trees
    and maid them lots of fege levs as tis said
    ther nakednes to cover because they disobeayed
    and harkened to the serpents voyse as be
    wente from the power and enosensee
    so'? serpent man and all was then acurst
    and from the paradize of god then must
    be droven out of trew and swete felesty
    in to the earth and ther to die
    a wofull state thou riall seed
    the earth is now thy portion ther to feed
    thou that wast blesd one every side
    thy body soul and speireit santifide
    now thou must worke thy brous to wete
    thy living got by labboring sweat
    and be deprived which is thy grefe
    by thine one sin of gods relefe
    a flaming sord is plasd one every side
    the tree of life from thee to hide
    owoo is me thou that in joy was plasd
    thy buty is lost and glory its defasd
    when the sons of the morning sang for joy
    noe ravenest best culd thee anoy
    and all the creation of the lord
    joined in the harminy in one acord
    and as thou stodest in the power of god
    thou rulest them all as with a rode
    then all the hevenly host did ring
    and praisis to ther god did singe
    thuse all things in a hevenly sence
    stod in the power without ofence
    and god was known in purity
    his workmansheepe to glorifie
    o glorious splender did apere
    when all stod in the power without fere
    noe fere no shame no paine at all
    before man disobeaid and soe did fall
    from that blesd stat that he was maid
    death entered in and he decaide
    and soe became an obgect feat
    of misary and pain as it was meat
    and of a plesant noble plane divine
    became the seed of a strong degenerat vine
    what lamantation shall I take
    or can I soroing for the same forsake
    noe this my theme in constancy
    shall be proclamd with watere eie
    and never leve my lamentation
    for adams lose and his relation
    which by his sin did die the death
    from glory fell into the earth
    thou that the tree of file therone did feed
    and now becom a degenerate seed
    and now art subgect for to die
    and maid the senke of misery
    o wofull state which thou art in
    subjecte to death and every sin
    and is become a cage which is obserd
    of every hattful foul unclen beord
    and now destructtive misary thee atends
    rath indegnation now afends
    from god the giver of all because of sin
    that thou by degenaration art fallen in
    let the hills morne and the earth reall
    and glomines be established as a seale
    let spings be sory and floods lamente
    that man is lost and from the power rent
    misery is spread the earth it is poluted
    the rath of god one it is exsecuted
    great confusion and perplexity is come one all
    the whole creation travells in pain and shall
    crie out in grefe in harte and minde
    because from god thay are declinde
    and tornd aside the serpent to obeay
    with sin them selfs for to araye
    o innosensie thy day is gone and past
    thy soroe now apers and is like to last
    and thou hast lost thy habitation
    which thou wast in the first creation
    because thou disobeayed the Lord thy god
    thou are like to feele yt corecting rode
    of his displesiour and his ire
    which thee shall borne with everlasting fire
    [and] all thing yt was maid in yt creation
    [cry] out in paine and make a lamentation
    [until] all the hevenly host and angels cry
    [and] make a noise for the apostasie
    [which] man hath brought one him by sin
    [___________________________________]
    but com methinks I here proclaim
    a restorer againe for to be namd
    as woman plocke the frut and thorn [______]
    how seed shuld bruse the serpents head
    which seed is Crist as screpture saith
    the same that all the holy saw by faith
    as good ould Jacub said unto his son
    the law shuld not depart tell (it is done)
    and profets of the lord did planly tell
    that he shuld restore his people Esrael
    and be a light unto the gentles in his birth
    and grante salvation to the ends of yt earth
    a restorer of breches to walke in
    which adam maid by wofull sin
    as by one man sin was sprade
    soe by one man it was captive lead
    awake awake put on thy power
    o sion thy butiful garments like a touer
    o Jerusalem thou setie of god I mean
    the unsercomsised in thee shant loge nor nothing yts unclean
    how beutifull upon the mountains are the feet
    of him yt publesheth salvation and will thee meet
    and bring good tidings of things thats good
    which shall be thy everlasting foode
    thy watchmen shall left upe ther ways one hie
    and sing for thay shall see thee eie to eie
    when that the lord shall bringe againe
    sions joy with power and might and main
    arise shine for thy light is as the day
    the glory of the lord is resen I doe say
    thy people all shall rightuous bee
    the land inhereit to eternetey
    wachmen have I seat upeon thy wall
    shall never hould ther pese but still shall call
    tell rightuousnes the earth shall fill
    and praisis maid one sions hill
    and all thy cheldren shall regose
    thy saints and all thy army which is great
    shout out for joy and wonders doe relate
    the lord hath anointed thee with gladness
    and taken from thee all kind of sadness
    and sent ye forth to prech the exseptable yere
    to presoners of hoop who did the fere
    [_______] men and [_______] theren this is the day
    com forth thou seed of Jacub doe not stay
    arise and come and be thou sattisfied
    in god the lord his name be magnified
    and drenk deep drafts thy soul refresh
    and feed one him and not transgres
    [_______] of my soule and be contente
    [___________________________________]
    into the world for to restore and win
    the same that adam lost by wofull sin
    and be contente and sattisfied be
    for in thy faith in him thou shalt be free
    from that which would thee captive lead
    and shall pertake with him and feed
    of his good things thou shalt pertake
    and he will never thee forsake
    but still thy wants he will supplie
    as thou standest in the enosency
    o soul what canst thou crave to have
    when this same trunke is laid in grave
    but to posese that everlasting croune
    which he perchast by laying his life doune
    o frinds he waits our souls to bringe
    unto his father deer our hevenly kinge
    unto his mention house wher we shall be
    preists and kings forever in innosencye
    o com therfore doe not delaye
    for this is now the longe desired day
    for he is come yt we have waited long to see
    the choysest of ten thousand will he be
    our love our dove our undefile
    the wachmen of the night noe more shall us beguile
    he feeds among the lelles and doth knoke
    swet merce and all as is left upon the lokke
    he is alltogether comly o com behould
    his countinance is rudy briter than the gould
    the smell of his garments is like lebanon
    o come my frinds let us feed therone
    and solous our selfs in his great love
    his bed is grene he dwells above
    and drenke aboundantly our souls to fill
    of shilos brooks that ronethe small and still
    this is a day he may be founde
    waite enwardly to here his sound
    for what is to be known of God is manifest
    in man: that is our chefest test
    and rule of life for to walke by
    as wee doe stande in the pure enosency
    and give obediance whene it calls
    then will our case not be like Soalls
    that god woulde answer him noe more
    by urim or thomen as be fore
    but will bow his head and hear
    the crise of them that do not fear
    and answer the request of this [______]
    that calls on him [__________]
    will answer thee in a holy sence
    the word of life for to comence
    and thou shalt trumtet out and crie
    unto the people far and nie
    to repent and to draw nere
    and wait one god with dread and fere
    and soe I shall conclud and say
    the lord he is my refuge day by day
    au my honor and everlasting praise
    is given and sounded forth my soul now sais
    even this time forth unto the end
    praises and thanksgiving my soul doth send2
  • (Writer) Letter Text: circa 1698; Henry White’s Epistle

    from north Carolina or Ronake a shorte apesell of love and good will to frinds everywhere sent forth as the wedos might for the comforting consalating and _______ of the flocke of god and allsoe a few words in verse conserning the fall of man and how thay went from god in the fall and allsoe conserning Restoration by Crist Jesus and his glorious aperance and some wholsom exhortations for everyone to take notis of given forth by one who has love in his harte to all mankind and desires and breaths in his harte and soul that all may com to the knowlege of god which is life eternall and am known by the name of henry white.

    Tender and beloved frinds and brethren in the Lord the love that is conseved in my hart abounds towards you ward in the overflowing of it and opens the springs of life love and pece and from thence esheweth forth strems of love which reacheth to the lest member in the camp of the lord and abounds to all the frock of gods heritage: soe in this love I greet you all and dsire and beseech all frinds everywhere to be valiant for gods truth which we profese and keep out of all incumberancis that may be a henderance of this blessed pece which yee knowe we have bin maid pertakers of and this holy aninting which we have known and our hands have handled and our mouths have tasted of the sweetness of the lovelynes of the virtue and comlynes of this devine techer and hevenly instrucktter of this true informer and holy derecter who hath brought our souls into one holy reverence and blessed communion with the father and with the son and one with another soe that this blessed fellowshipe and holy communion recheth from Island to Island and from sea to sea and abounds toward one another in a trew felling sence of one anothers condetions: by this we infailable know we are the children of god because ye presious love of god abounds in our harts towards one another and sealls and bulds us upe together unto eternall life in the bundle of love which is marvelus and great incurement.

    My deer and tender ons for us who hath bin maid sencable of this swete aninting and holy unction to prese forward in this holy way and plesant path let not that which we flet and injoyed yesterday serve us today but let our souls be ever hungering for more of the same greatter attainments and greater injoyments aferder manifestation of devine openings and hevenly Incoms that our stranth may dayly be renewed even from stranth to stranth and that we may know a groth and fele swete incomes and devine elumination of the lord to drope down as the small raine or as the dw of hevmon that our souls my therby be refreshed and that we may growe as lilies of the valley and like a well watered garden floresh and increase which bringeth forth frute in its season and satisfieth the eater soe deer and tender babs and children of the morning what can our souls desire more but to be in Joye of that which we have bin waiting for and still to redobble our deligence for fresh suplis and hevenly satisfaction so to this I recommend yee all with my one soule

    henry white

    Source:

    The Southern Friend: The Journal of the North Carolina Friends Historical Society, Vol. 6, #2 (Fall 1984), Page 12, from an article by Thomas E. Terrell, Jr., “The Origins of Religious and Literary Life in North Carolina: Henry White of Albemarle” See also this author’s article in Vol. 6, #1 (Spring 1984), “Some Holsom Exhortations”: Henry White’s Seventeenth-Century Southern Religious Narrative in Verse” by the same author.
  • (Testator) Will*: 19 September 1706; North Carolina; Allbamarll this 19 day of the 7 month 1706

    I Henry White senier being sike and week yeat in perfect and sound memory doe make this my last will and testiment in maner and form as folloeth revoking all former wills by me maid and concluding this will to be the very intente and full porpose of my mind.

    Imprimus after my justs debts are paid and funerall charges defraid I doe leve that small estat that the lord hath given me as hereafter folloeth

    first I give and bequeth to my deer and loving wife all my houshold goods with that small stock of cattle that she may dispose of them amonst her children that every one of them may have some thing of a stock to goe one; and I doe allsoe give unto my said wife one yong negro man named dick so long as she liveth or while her naturall life indurs but after desese I doe give the said negro to my three yongest sons namely henry: Arnould: and Isack: white to have him every one his tourne yere by yere begining at the eldest and I doe give unto my three daters content mary and naomy one yong mair she and her ____ to be divided amonst them and ech of them one yere and to my aforenamed sones one yong maire to be devided as aforesaid and the rest of horse kinds I doe give unto my wife onely my will is that she give to my grand daughter susana white the first mair fould that the maire bringeth I doe allsoe give unto my said wife my maner house and plantation with what land she may haive acation of dureing her naturall life: but I doe leve and give all my whole devednt that and all after my wifes desese unto my five sons namly Robert: John: henry: arnould and Isaac White: Only thers none of them shall molest Jacob overman Junier if my said land doth rech his house but he shall in Joy it forevr and ferder I give and bequeth unto my two eldest sons Robert and John white one yong negro man called tobee: to be devided after this maner Robert white to have him one yere and John white to have him two yeres and soe forward it is ferder to be understood that all those premisis that is here by me given is to them and ther heirs forever and I do herby nomynat my deerly beloved wife and my two sons Robert and John white my exsebitrer and exsekitors of this my will to see after the performance of it to the premisis I have hereunto set my hand seall

    henry white

    sealled signed and delevered in the presence of us
    Jeremyah Symons
    John Raper
    John Symons
    3
  • (Deceased) Death*: 3 August 1712; Pasquotank Pct., North Carolina4
  • Biography*: Henry White III was a leader in th early Quaker church in Perquimans Pct. NC. Quoting The History of Perquimans Co. NC: "From records still extant it seems certain that Little River meeting was the earliest to be set up in Perquimans, and the Virginia records are authority for the fact that Henry White built the first Meeting House. He was already a resident of Perquimans Precinct as early as 1699, at which time a meeting was held at his house, where Quaker marriages were solemnized. Taking into consideration the fact that he lived in that part of Perquimans bordering on Little River, somewhere near the present town of Woodville just across the line from Pasquotank County, makes it all the more evident that the church he built was somewhere in the vicinity of his own home, then too records show that part of Perquimans was the earliest and most thickly settled." In 1688, Henry White and James Davis witnessed the deed of Thomas Jacocks to Walter Senicer5

    the following is from from The Hill Family of Chowan County North Carolina :
    by Anne L. McCarthy

    One of the earliest Quakers in Pasquotank County was Henry White who had come from Isle of
    Wight County, Virginia, around 1670. He had purchased lands at the head of Little River where
    a preparatory meeting had been established as early as 1663. White served as Registrar for
    Little River Meeting and for the Pasquotank Monthly Meeting which included four other meetings
    besides Little River. He served on the North Carolina Higher court and for short periods of time
    on the Precinct County Court.
    White gave land for the building of a school alongside the meeting house which was the first
    school built in North Carolina, and he taught in that school. A poem White wrote in 1698 as a
    teaching tool for his students came to light at Guilford College in Greensboro, NC. This long
    poem is said to be the oldest extant work of poetry from the southern states. It apparently
    was used as a form of communication with other Quaker meetings in various regions and to
    instruct his pupils with a religious message of the Quaker faith at the same time.
    As a young man White had attended school in Isle of Wight County, where his father made a
    living as a cooper and served as Justice of the Peace. His grandfather, Henry White, had lived
    on Queen's Creek in York County, north of Williamsburg.
    In 1631 Governor John Harvey determined to secure the area between the James and York
    Rivers by building a palisade across the peninsula between Archer's Hope (College Creek) and
    Queen's Creek. Incentives were offered to any settler who would relocate to that area to defend
    and protect the development of the area. Fifty acres were offered to each man who would
    relocate there for the first year, twenty-five acres for a second year. This may have been the
    incentive for families like the Whites and the Hills to spend a short period at Queen's Creek in
    York county, later returning to the counties south of the James River.

Family 1: Mary (?) b. c 1645, d. 3 May 1679

Family 2: Damaris Page b. c 1659, d. 12 Sep 1722

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, pages 61, 79.
  2. [S1] from an article in The Southern Friend: The Journal of the North Carolina Friends Historical Society, Vol. 6, Issue 2 (Fall 1984)
    Coutesty of Irvine Davis of Albuquerque, NM. Digitized by James Hardy Griffin (ID: 15950) son of Clay Gibson Griffin.
  3. [S1] The Southern Friend: The Journal of the North Carolina Friends Historical Society, Vol. 6, #2 (Fall 1984), Page 5

    Article: "The Origins of Religious and Literary Life in North Carolina: Henry White of Albemarle" by Thomas E. Terrell, Jr.
  4. [S15] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I North Carolina, page 124.
  5. [S44] Mrs. Watson Winslow, History of Perquimans Co., NC, p. 41.

Mary (?)1

F, b. circa 1645, d. 3 May 1679
  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2018
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1645
  • Married Name: say 1661; White
  • (Bride) Marriage*: say 1668; North Carolina; Groom=Henry White III
  • (Deceased) Death*: 3 May 1679; Pasquotank Pct., North Carolina2
  • Research Note*: 23 August 2009; This writer has doubts that the following information is relevant to Henry White II of Perquimans, who married Mary (surname unknown):

    William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers, Vol. 2, No. 4. (Apr., 1894), pp. 270-278. NOTES AND QUERIES. CROSHAW - WEST - GRAVES - WHITE. Joseph Croshaw, J. P. of York County, 1655, and sub- sequent years, major of militia, member of H. of B. in 1659 and 1660, died 10th April, 1667. Married
    1. ------ ------
    2. Perhaps widow Finch [the index of the oldest book (1644-1649) in the clerk's office at Yorktown, the front pages being torn away, has "Croshaw's joynture to Mrs. ffinch", "his bond to menteyne Elizabeth ffinch", "his bond for a heifer to Betty ffinch". Henry Finch brother of Sir John Finch was in the Council, 1631-'33].
    3. Anne ----, relict of Augustine Hodges, who d. after Jan. 25, 1660-'61, and she remar. Croshaw before July 24, 1661, and died July 20, 1663.
    4. Margaret ---- (d. Sept. 30, 1664), widow of Daniel Tucker who had Dorothy Tucker. (D. T. mar. 1st Capt, Bryan Smith of New Kent and 2d Hugh Owen, the lawyer).
    5. Mary ----, widow of Thomas Bromfield (d. Sept. 1665).
    She survived him and married 2dly Clement Marsh.
    Issue of Cro- Page 271. shaw by his first wife:
    Benjamin and Joseph (godsons of Dr. John Broch), living in 1646, but d.s.p.
    Rachel married to Ralph Graves before 1656;
    Mary mar. to Henry White before 1661; and
    Unity, wife of Col. John West, nephew of Lord Delaware.
    The 3d wife must have married three times as she had a daughter living in 1661 by name Jane Bignall.
    By the 5th wife [she had Anne Bromfield by 1st marr.] he had Joseph, who married, but d.s.p.; and Col. John West received the whole estate of Major Croshaw. His home was called "Poplar Neck", and was sold by Col. West and Unity, his wife, in 1687 to Edmund Jenings, Secretary of State, who named it "Rippon Hall", and died there June 2, 1727.
    Ralph1 Graves (d. May 9, 1667), headright to Croshaw, had Anne, Ralph2, William and Mary. His widow, Rachel, m., 2dly Richard Barnes, and d. April 20, 1669.
    Ralph2 Graves m. his cousin, Unity, d. of Henry and Mary (Croshaw) White, and had Ralph2 (d. Feb. 1748-9), who m. 1st Mary d. of William Pinkethman and 2dly Elizabeth -----, and had William4, Henry, Richard4, Richard Croshaw, Unity m. William Hilliard, Elizabeth m. ----- Stone.
    William4 died in 1758, and had Ralph5, John, Henry Brown, Mary m. ----- Winfrey, Susannah m. ----- Powsers, and Sally.
    Ralph5, son of William4, mar. Letitia Power, dau. of Major John Power of New Kent County (his will was proved in York County, 15th Feb. 1768) and had Letitia Power Graves, "his heiress", who m. John M. Gregory, father of Gov. John M. Gregory who was born July 8, 1804.
    Richard4 Graves, of New Kent County, m. Dyonisia - and had Charles Henry (b. 1753), Mary, William (b. 1756), Ralph (b. 1758), and Sarah Cobb.
    Richard Croshaw4 m. before 1771 Elizabeth, dau. of Joseph Valentine.
    Capt. Richard Croshaw was brother of Major Joseph Croshaw and was b. in 1621 and d. in April, 1669; m. Elizabeth -----, and left Benjamin d.s.p. [as Benjamin was a name given to a son by each brother it was probably the name of their father], Rachel who m. John Walker, of St. Steven's Parish in King and Queen County, Margaret d.s.p., and Elizabeth who m. Rie Jones of York County. [The latter's will was proved May 24, 1697; he had Morris Jones, Rebecca, and other children. In 1724, Elizabeth, admr. of Richard Croshaw Walker, was wife to Christopher Beverely. Croshaw is sometimes written Crosher in the records.] Page 272.
    [Authorities for the above are: York County Records, Bruton Parish Register, Sainsbury MSS., Ludwell MSS., and St. Peter's Parish Register. The Abingdon Parish Register has interesting data about a family of Graves, in which Thomas, John and Benjamin occur as family names. These entries will be given in the next number.]3,4
  • Research Note: 27 August 2009; From: Earl Davis:
    ....
    I honestly don't know where I got Mary Croshaw as Henry White (jr.) wife. It has alway been accepted to be true? I am sure I got it years agofrom a souce I trust, perhaps Rebecca Sanders?I would not have it in my line if there were a doubt or it would have a ?. I will try to find my source. There has been some confusing between Henry White Jr. Henry of Albermarle and his father Henry White.
    
    Mary Croshaw would certainly have been a Quaker. The Quakers, at that time,disfellowshipped Friends that married outside of the faith. I fear this lack oftolerance, that is so unlike Friends,is one big reason why the Friends numbers deminished.
    
    My own William Rolfe Davis [ID:1929] left the Friends and was in his latter years avestryman in St John's (now StPaul's) Parish, Church of England, in Beaufort NC.
    ....
    Earl Davis
    Asheville NC5

Family: Henry White III b. 1642, d. 3 Aug 1712

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.124.
  2. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p. 124.
  3. [S1] http://listlva.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=VA-HIST;mw2weA;20010422203202-0400.
  4. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
  5. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    e-mail address (Earl Davis)
    Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2009 5:25 PM.

William Davis1

M, b. 2 April 1693, d. circa 1756
  • Last Edited: 21 Nov 2017
  • (Child) Birth*: 2 April 1693; Pasquotank Pct., North Carolina
  • (Groom) Marriage*: circa 1711; Perquimans Pct, North Carolina; Bride=Mary Wicker
  • (Deceased) Death*: circa 1756; Carteret Co., North Carolina
  • Biography*: Although born to devout Quaker parents, William became a member of the Church of England and was for many years one of the five Lay Readers of the church in Carteret County. For this service he was paid the sum of 8 lbs. per annum. He removed to Carteret Co. in about 1728. In that year a deed of sale was recorded for land purchased by William Davis from John Rhodes. In the same year, Joseph Wicker was ordered to pay county funds to William Davis for construction of a Court House. In his will, which was not dated, but probated at the June, 1756 court, he mentions that his five youngest sons are to received "horses & mares now at brother's". To which brother he refers has not yet been determined. Sources: History of Perquimans County, North Carolina, p.337, Mrs. Watson Winslow, Raleigh, NC., 1931. 1990. Early Records of North Carolina, Vol. VIII, Wills 1756-1794, p.19, Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., Keysville, VA., 1994. Genealogical research notes and letters of Calvin Lyle Ham, Austin, TX, 1995. Kith & Kin of Eastern Carteret County, pp.1, 2, "Davis Family Background", Thelma P. Simpson and Rebecca W. Sanders, Beaufort, NC., 1983. Carteret County Wills, 1700-1880, p.117, Rebecca W. Sanders, Smithfield, NC, 1980. Early Records of North Carolina, Volume VIII: Wills, 1756-1794, p.19, Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., Keysville, VA., 1994. Her father was a Justice of the first Carteret County Court, and its clerk in 1725-26. He was a representative in the State Legislature in 1733. She received from his estate an island in Core Sound, since named "Davis Island". Source: Kith and Kin of Eastern Carteret County, p.1, "Davis Family Background", Thelma P. Simpson and Rebecca W. Sanders, Beaufort, NC., 1983.

Family: Mary Wicker b. c 1695

Citations

  1. [S520] Mrs. Watson Winslow, History of Perquimans County, NC, p.337.

Mary Wicker

F, b. circa 1695
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: William Davis b. 2 Apr 1693, d. c 1756

Mary Davis

F, b. November 1694
  • Last Edited: 22 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S15] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I North Carolina, p.98.

John Davis1

M, b. 14 March 1696, d. 12 April 1719
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.

James Davis1

M, b. 6 October 1698, d. 24 May 1720
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.

Henry Davis1

M, b. January 1713, d. 10 January 1719
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.

James Bryant III

M, b. circa 1728
  • Last Edited: 19 Oct 2000

James Davis

M, b. 3 June 1726, d. 4 December 1757
  • Last Edited: 19 Nov 2017

Family: Ruth Bundy b. c 1726

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.132.

Ruth Bundy

F, b. circa 1726
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: James Davis b. 3 Jun 1726, d. 4 Dec 1757

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.132.

Thomas Davis1

M, b. 10 February 1729, d. 27 August 1781
  • Last Edited: 19 Nov 2017
  • Biography*: Thomas received from the estate of his father, "100 acres joining Joseph Lowry". One of his daughters married John Symons. He is shown on the roster of the Pasquotank County militia company of Capt. Henry Delon in 1755. Sources: Colonial Soldiers of the South, 1732-1774, p.770, Murtie June Clark, Crofton, MD., 1983. Early Records of North Carolina, Volume VII: Wills 1750-1755, p.27, Dr.Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., 1994. Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume I:North Carolina, p.98, William Wade Hinshaw, 1936. 1948. 1978. Wills, Pasquotank and Camden Counties, p.7, Bertha Burgess Cahoon, Camden Historical Society, Elizabeth City, NC. 1960.
  • (Child) Birth*: 10 February 1729; Pasquotank Co., North Carolina
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 13 December 1752; Pasquotank Co., North Carolina; Bride=Liddea Griffin1
  • (Deceased) Death*: 27 August 1781; Pasquotank Co., North Carolina

Family: Liddea Griffin b. s 1732

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.

Liddea Griffin

F, b. say 1732
  • Last Edited: 21 Feb 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: say 1732
  • (Bride) Marriage*: 13 December 1752; Pasquotank Co., North Carolina; Groom=Thomas Davis1
  • Married Name: 13 December 1752; Davis
  • Research Note*: 21 February 2019; Liddea may have been the daughter of the James Griffin who died in 1749 and his wife Sarah, but he did not mention his daughters in his will, so it is unclear how to prove this. She may have also been a daughter of one of James's sons. She is a good bit younger than any of the known children of James and Sarah. In any case, she was most likely, somehow, part of this family.2

Family: Thomas Davis b. 10 Feb 1729, d. 27 Aug 1781

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.
  2. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.

Joshua Davis1

M, b. 1 December 1731, d. 1787
  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.

Huldah White

F, b. circa 1734, d. 19 August 1796
  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2017

Family: Joshua Davis b. 14 Dec 1724, d. 17 Apr 1788

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.78 r.m.t.

Elizabeth Davis1

F, b. 2 May 1734
  • Last Edited: 19 Nov 2017
  • Biography*: Elizabeth received from the estate of her father, "2 mares, bed & furniture, heifer." On 1 Jan 1753, she declared her intention to marry Robert White. The church objected to this union, "because nearer of kin than second cousin." Sources: Early Records of North Carolina, Volume VII: Wills 1750-1755, p.27, Dr.Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., 1994. Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume I:North Carolina, p.137, William Wade Hinshaw, 1936. 1948. 1978.
  • (Child) Birth*: 2 May 1734; Pasquotank Co., North Carolina
  • (Bride) Marriage*: 1753; Pasquotank Co., North Carolina; Groom=Robert White
  • Married Name: 1753; White

Family: Robert White b. c 1731

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.

Ruth Davis1

F, b. 7 February 1737
  • Last Edited: 19 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.98.

Robert White

M, b. circa 1731
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Elizabeth Davis b. 2 May 1734

Michal Vick1

F, b. circa 1762
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: John Davis b. c 1759, d. 1831

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.319.

Sarah Davis

F, b. circa 1763, d. before 1807
  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2017

Family: Caleb Hall b. s 1761

Caleb Hall

M, b. say 1761
  • Last Edited: 29 Jul 2001

Family: Sarah Davis b. c 1763, d. b 1807

Richard Davis

M, b. circa 1752
  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2017

Family: Mary Morris b. c 1755, d. 13 Dec 1799

Joshua Davis1

M, b. circa 1756, d. 30 May 1802
  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2017

Family: Elizabeth Newsome b. 9 Dec 1765

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.285.
  2. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.304.

Elizabeth Newsome

F, b. 9 December 1765
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Joshua Davis b. c 1756, d. 30 May 1802

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.292.
  2. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.304.

Rachel Davis

F, b. circa 1766
  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2017

Family: Thomas Overman b. 17 Dec 1754

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.304.

Thomas Overman

M, b. 17 December 1754
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Rachel Davis b. c 1766

Citations

  1. [S518] William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol I, p.304.