Lewis Wyman Griffin

M, b. 6 October 1915, d. 6 October 1981
  • Last Edited: 17 Apr 2019
  • (Child) Birth*: 6 October 1915; Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
  • (Brother) Photographed: circa 1940; Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee; Principal=Joseph Wyeth Griffin1
    Joseph Wyeth, James Maurice, & Lewis Wyman Griffin
  • Marriage*: 12 December 1942; Birmingham, Jefferson Co., Alabama; Principal=Mildred Walene Latimer
  • (son-in-law) Photographed: 25 July 1948; New Site, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama; Standing left to right: Louise Latimer, Annie Ruth Lovell, Mildred Griffin, Jessie McIntosh, Bernie Latimer, Elizabeth Latimer, Margaret Brown, Nannie Latimer;
    kneeling left to right: Ralph Latimer, Dan Lovell with daughter Dannye Sue Lovell, Lewis Griffin with daughter Bonnie Griffin, James McIntosh, J. B. Latimer, Roy Latimer, Walker Dunson; Principal=Nannie Texonia Jackson2
    Latimer family
  • Divorce*: circa 1967; Jefferson Co., Alabama; Principal=Mildred Walene Latimer3
  • (Deceased) Death*: 6 October 1981; Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
  • (Interred) Burial*: 8 October 1981; Memorial Park Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
  • Biography*:       James M. Griffin wrote 20 Apr 1977: I suppose you know your Daddy was named after Lewis Culpepper and Lewis Halsey - The Wyman was for a Doctor Wyman.
          James O. Griffin, Lewis Wyman Griffin's father, was overseas during World War I and he wrote his young son several letters. This is one: ___________________________________________________1919 Dear Lewis I bet you slumber in dream land while I am writing to you. It is about half past seven A.M. over here and I will let you guess what time it is over [t]here. Dad is feeling fine and dandy this morning. My neck is still improving. I can twist it around like an owl now. Do you know how much they can twist their necks? There is still an enlargement on the right side but there is no soreness to it. In fact there is only little soreness about it anywhere. They tell us that we are going to move into another ward today, but I do not know whether there is any truth in it or not. This section of the center is to close out by the twentieth so I guess we will not be here much longer. Have you gotten your tricycle yet? Dad has got the money to buy it with when he gets back on that side of the ocean. But you must not try to ride down that big hill when you get it. You may ride up the hill but I am afraid that you will have a runaway if you try to ride down the big hill. It looks like it is going to be a fair day in France. Yesterday afternoon was fine. Be a nice good sweet boy and have a good time. ___________________________________________________Love from Dad

          A brother, James M. Griffin, wrote 10 Oct 1981 that as James O. Griffin changed the location of his practice, the family moved from Hackneyville, AL to Goodwater, to Leeds, to Eclectic, to Moulton, AL and finally to Memphis, TN. One of Lewis W. Griffin's childhood jobs was to hold a lantern by the buggie wheels when Dr. Griffin made his occasional night calls. This was to keep clear of ruts. A cousin, Mrs. C. H. (Margaret Whatley) Lee wrote, 31 Jan 1982, of her memories of these early years: I thought of your daddy and the memories I have of him when he would visit our home in the summer along with Joe [Inzer] Griffin. Your daddy, Joe and Chalmus [W. Whatley] were right at the same age. They sure had a great time romping in daddy's pasture and playing in the creek. There used to be tremendous rains and the creek would get up and those boys would get mother's tubs and float on the water in those tubs. It's a wonder they didn't get killed, but they sure had fun. They would go to the watermellon patch and there were so many things of interest for them to do.

          Lewis moved to Memphis in 1928 with his family. One of his recollections was working in a grocery store during high school. He earned enough money to purchase a bicycle -- only to have the bicycle stolen soon thereafter. He seems to have been a fan of Coca Cola. He remembered a contest in the 1920's or early 1930's, in which you had to look inside cap of a Coca Cola bottle to win a prize. In later years, when he was working for Universal Atlas Cement in Leeds, he recalled that the old glass coke bottles all had a city of origin on the bottom of the bottles. In those days the glass bottles were washed and reused. So he and his co-workers used to engage in a friendly bet, as to who had the Coke bottle with furthest away city of origin.

          Lewis graduated from Central High School in Memphis. He was the second string quarterback there, and used to have stories to tell about his football exploits against Little Rock. On 19 Jun 1934 he enlisted in the Navy as an Apprentice Seaman and served aboard the U.S.S. Colorado. He became a Fireman Second Class then a Fireman First Class and was stationed in the boiler division and maintained the boilers and the auxiliary equipment. His ship was part of the search for the downed plane of aviator Amelia Earhart. He was honorably discharged 26 Mar 1938 as a Watertender Second Class. He was listed as 5 ft. 7 3/4 in., 160 lbs. with blue eyes, brown hair, and a ruddy complexion.

          After leaving the Navy, he was employed by U.S. Bedding as quality inspector in the production of mattresses and studio couches, but September 1940, he got a job at DuPont at Millington, TN as a carpenter's helper doing construction. In a 11 Feb 1972 letter, Lewis W. Griffin wrote: I was working for Du Pont at Millington, Tenn., which is about 15 miles north of Memphis - I went to work there as a Carpenter's Helper making 60 cents an hour - this was better than the 49 cents an hour I was making at U.S. Bedding Co. Well, when they put the Power House in operation, I was called in to help start it up - On my application blank was my Navy Service - [so they knew] I knew how to operate Turbines and Boilers - So [I] was jumped to 90 cents [as turbine operator] and then again to $1.25 [as boiler operator] - Boy, by then I thought I was rich - Well then the Japs hit Pearl Harbor.... Anyway, I was called to the office and was informed that the management wanted me to go to [Alabama Ordnance Works at] Childersburg [AL] to help start [a power house at ] a new Powder Plant.... When I first got to Childersburg, I was still a Boiler Operator, then after training several people... I was promoted to outside Foreman, then to Shift Supervisor and then to Training Supervisor - The Draft was taking people far faster than you could train them - Back in those days, a turbine was $90,000... so, if you did not know how to get it on the line, you could wreck it in a hurry.... I helped start up the Power House at Millington, at Childersburg #1 Power House and also #2 Power House. At #2 Power House we were making super heated steam for the turbines and then we had the reducing stations to cut it back to 300# - 150# - 50# saturated steam - This all went back through the whole Powder Plant to make gun powder as well as T.N.T. and Tetryl - you should see how all these things come out.... I had to explain to a Powder Line Foreman that he should call before he simply cuts everything off. Something like that really makes it rough and you really have to run not to lose everything. Now at Childersburg, they built what then was Plant III - me and my boss had the only Pass from the Power Dept. that could get in.... They used millions of gallons of water per day and as to how much saturated steam, I do not know - they would simply call that they were not getting the water so we would go to the Pump House and put another pump out the line - They were making the Heavy Water which was in the first Atomic Bomb that was dropped - Childersburg produced the Heavy Water and from there I guess it went to Oak Ridge, Tenn.

          The plant shut down in December 1945 and Lewis found work for a few months selling farm implements for McNess Sales Co. before getting hired as a Shift Foreman for the Universal Atlas Cement Division of U.S. Steel Corporation plant in Leeds, AL. He supervised the kilns, raw mills, finish mills, raw storage, and clinker storage and 14 men in the production of seven types of cement. He retired as the General Operating Foreman.

          In Leeds, in 1946, the Griffin family lived at 3000 4th Avenue South, then the family moved in 1951 into a new home on 3323 Norman Drive. Finally, they moved in 1961 into a house which Lewis had built on 3 acres of land near the Ashville & Montevallo Road into Leeds. Mrs. J. A. (Bonnie Griffin) Turnage wrote of a visit to Leeds in a 19 Jul 1981 letter to her father: We [the Turnage family] rode around in Leeds briefly - You can't see the house on Montevallo Rd. for all the pine trees - they are really pretty. The house on Norman Drive looks good - they have it a light green - I didn't have time to see about getting any rose cuttings - The backyard sure looked good tho. Leeds looks about the same except for a few new buildings - It felt good being there - I feels like home even tho I don't have any kinfolks there.

          Lewis W. Griffin died in his sleep 6 Oct 1981 of "Arteriosclerotic Heart Disease" according to the certificate of death. The following obituary is from the Memphis paper: LEWIS W. GRIFFIN, 66, of 883 Hawthorne, retired executive with the Universal Atlas Cement Co. in Leeds, Ala., [died] yesterday at home. He was a member of Leeds Presbyterian Church and a veteran of the Navy. He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Bonnie Turnage of McComb, Miss.; two sons, Lewis W. Griffin Jr. of Palo Alto, Calif., and John Griffin of Birmingham, Ala.; five sisters, Ruth Griffin of Memphis, Mrs. Louise Vaughn of Sun City, Ariz., Mrs. Clarice Duscoe of Union City, Tenn., Mrs. Frances Brown of Chattanooga and Mrs. Marie Middlecoff of Somerville, Tenn.; a brother, James Griffin of Memphis; and four grandchildren. Services at 10:45 a.m. tomorrow at Memphis Funeral Home on Union; burial in Memorial Park.

          Mrs. J. A. (Bonnie Griffin) Turnage wrote in a 23 Oct 1981 letter: He [Lewis W. Griffin, Sr.] was buried right next to his parents & the gravesite is really pretty - on a hill. The cemetery is one of the prettiest I've ever seen.
  • Research Note*: 10 May 2013; From James J. Griffin:
    FYI, the site of your dad?s house was the former site of a small tenant shack occupied by a black family who helped in various ways (therein lie some really funny stories) and during the flood of 1941 their house was totally surrounded by water which had risen during the night and they had to be rescued by someone with a row boat. My dad?s car was in the garage under the house and was completely covered with water which fortunately stopped rising within a few inches from the floor of our house.
    ; Principal=Joseph Wyeth Griffin4

Family: Mildred Walene Latimer b. 6 Jun 1921, d. 19 Nov 1984

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    photo courtesy of Julie Griffin Cooper of Birmingham, AL.
  2. [S414] Lynn (Latimer) Pahl e-mail e-mail, 2009 - 2014,.
  3. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
  4. [S436] James Judge Griffin e-mail, e-mail address, 2011 - 2014,.

James M. Griffin

M, b. 17 June 1850, d. 9 February 1922
  • Last Edited: 25 Sep 2018
  • (Child) Birth*: 17 June 1850; Chambers Co., Alabama
  • Photographed*: say 1873; Alabama1
    James M. Griffin
  • (Groom) Marriage*: circa 1873; Clay Co., Alabama; Bride=Sarah Frances Smith
  • (head of family) 1900 Census*: 1 June 1900; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama; Wife=Sarah Frances Smith2
  • (Deceased) Death*: 9 February 1922; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
  • Burial*: 10 February 1922; Old Lineville City Cemetery, Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
  • Obituary*: 10 February 1922; J. M. Griffin Dies at Age 71

    Early Thursday morning the death knell was sounded and Uncle Jimmy Griffin Passed away into the realm of the spirit world.
    He had been desperately ill for several years and death was not a surprise. Mr. Griffin has lived in and around Lineville practically all his life, enjoying the happiness of 71 years. He was born in Chambers County and came with his parents, when quite small, to Clay County, living first near Mellow Valley and next at Carbon Mountain.
    His aged companion and two adopted children survive him.
    Funeral survices will be held at the Baptist Church with Rev. Driskell and Smylie conducting. Interment will be in the Lineville Cemetery Friday.3

Family: Sarah Frances Smith b. 10 Oct 1858, d. 12 Mar 1934

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    original at one time in the possession of Cornelia Reeves Bradford of Lineville, AL.
  2. [S1900] 1900 Federal census, , Lineville, Clay, Alabama; Roll: T623_9 Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 115.
    Household Members:
    Name
    Age
    James Griffin
    44
    Sarah Francis Griffin
    41.
  3. [S1] The Lineville Headlight, Friday, February 10, 1922, Vol. 20, No.47.

Sarah Catherine Griffin

F, b. 15 November 1853, d. 20 April 1941
  • Last Edited: 16 Oct 2013

Family: Woody Burge Smith b. 20 Feb 1847, d. 26 Oct 1934

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesy of Earl Grady Smith.
  2. [S478] Edith Ann (Barger) Ley e-mail, e-mail address, Jun 2012 - Oct 2013,.
  3. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesy of the late Kathryn Reeves Allen.

Sarah Frances Smith

F, b. 10 October 1858, d. 12 March 1934
  • Last Edited: 25 Sep 2018

Family: James M. Griffin b. 17 Jun 1850, d. 9 Feb 1922

Citations

  1. [S1900] 1900 Federal census, , Lineville, Clay, Alabama; Roll: T623_9 Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 115.
    Household Members:
    Name
    Age
    James Griffin
    44
    Sarah Francis Griffin
    41.

Washington Syrus Smith

M, b. 30 October 1816, d. 4 December 1896
  • Last Edited: 18 Nov 2018

Family: Emily Rogers Humphries b. 26 Aug 1818, d. 16 Jun 1885

Citations

  1. [S3] FindAGrave.com, .
    Find A Grave Memorial# 24315815.
  2. [S1850] 1850, Census, Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 19 and a half, Chambers, Alabama
    Page: 389
    Roll: M432_2.
  3. [S1860] 1860, Census, Post Office: Lineville
    Roll: M653_22
    Page: 786
    Home in 1860: Southern Division, Randolph, Alabama.
  4. [S1870] 1870, Census, Post Office: Lineville
    Roll: M593_8
    Page: 295
    Home in 1870: Township 20 Range 9, Clay Co. AL.
  5. [S1] Clay County Advance, Friday, December 18th, 1896, courtesy of Paul W. Smith.
  6. [S220] Susan Hardy VanHorn, Austin, TX, e-mail address, 2004 e-mails,.

Emily Rogers Humphries

F, b. 26 August 1818, d. 16 June 1885
  • Last Edited: 30 Nov 2017

Family: Washington Syrus Smith b. 30 Oct 1816, d. 4 Dec 1896

Citations

  1. [S1850] 1850, Census, Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 19 and a half, Chambers, Alabama
    Page: 389
    Roll: M432_2.
  2. [S1860] 1860, Census, Post Office: Lineville
    Roll: M653_22
    Page: 786
    Home in 1860: Southern Division, Randolph, Alabama.
  3. [S1870] 1870, Census, Post Office: Lineville
    Roll: M593_8
    Page: 295
    Home in 1870: Township 20 Range 9, Clay Co. AL.
  4. [S220] Susan Hardy VanHorn, Austin, TX, e-mail address, 2004 e-mails,.

Woody Burge Smith

M, b. 20 February 1847, d. 26 October 1934
  • Last Edited: 22 Sep 2018
  • (Child) Birth*: 20 February 1847; Georgia
  • War*: between 1861 and 1865; Woody was in Co F, 62nd Alabama Infantry, during the Civil War.
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 11 December 1872; Clay Co., Alabama; Bride=Sarah Catherine Griffin
  • Photographed*: say 1905; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama1
    Woody Burge Smith
  • (Deceased) Death*: 26 October 1934; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
  • Biography*: 16 September 2018; from Ada Barrett Carlisle, granddaughter of William S. Smith, 28 Dec 1934:
    "One [my mother's] brother was Woodie Smith living in Lineville, Alabama. He is nearly eighty years of age. My Cousin in Roanoke told me he was a very smart man and his sons are fine business and professional men. I intended going to Lineville to see this cousin while I was in Roanoke."

Family: Sarah Catherine Griffin b. 15 Nov 1853, d. 20 Apr 1941

Citations

  1. [S478] Edith Ann (Barger) Ley e-mail, e-mail address, Jun 2012 - Oct 2013,.

John Zachariah Griffin

M, b. 11 May 1860, d. 8 March 1929
  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2018
  • (Child) Birth*: 11 May 1860; Chambers Co., Alabama
  • Photographed: say 1880; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama1
    John Zachariah Griffin
  • Photographed*: say 1925; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama2
    John's store
    John Zachariah Griffin
  • (Deceased) Death*: 8 March 1929; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
  • Biography*: John's friend, John R. McCain, wrote a lengthy sketch of John Z. after his death, which appeared in the local newspaper: "....Among his intimate friends for many years the subject of this sketch has been known as "Honest John Z. Griffin.... His appreciation of and devotion to his loved ones were crowning virtues of his life. He was never married. He made his home most of the time with his parents until their death many years ago, and since ...has lived most the time with his widowed sister [Mrs. Mattie Reeves]. "In his boyhood days he worked on his father's farms, and while yet a young man he conducted a mercantile business for his father for many years. He spent some years in Atlanta, GA, and in Anniston, AL, serving on the Police Force part of that time, at least in Anniston. For many years he served on the Police Force at Lineville, AL. After serving as Chief of Police of Lineville many years he went with the A.B. & A. Railroad Company and was with said company until the general strike on that road in March, 1921. Soon after that he engaged in the grocery business here in Lineville in which business he remained until last year, when he moved out and went into business with Isaac Bradford, who married his niece. "Something like a month ago he was taken ill..., and although his physicians, loved ones and friends did what they could, on Friday morning... he passed to the great beyond."

    From Robert Hodnett:
    This was my Mom's, Martha Doris Reeves HODNETT, "Uncle John". She remembers that he had a room with Mattie in which he kept his guns. To the children, he had a lot of guns. They were left in the open, but the children knew not to bother them.

    There was a saying around Lineville that "John locked them up, and Barto cut them out". (Flemon Barto Cummings was a blacksmith.)

    From Lew Griffin:
    Martha's sister, Kathryn Reeves Allen, once told me that she remembered visiting "Uncle John" in his store in Lineville as a child, and that he would always give her a free piece of penny candy.

Citations

  1. [S1956] Mike Whatley e-mail, C WHATLEY <e-mail address>, Sep 2017,.
  2. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    original at one time in the possession of Cornelia Reeves Bradford of Lineville, AL.

Mattie Jane Griffin

F, b. 4 April 1869, d. 8 December 1956
  • Last Edited: 11 Dec 2017

Family: Willis Cornelius Reeves b. 21 Apr 1868, d. 23 Nov 1895

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesy of Kathryn Reeves Allen.

Willis Cornelius Reeves

M, b. 21 April 1868, d. 23 November 1895
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Mattie Jane Griffin b. 4 Apr 1869, d. 8 Dec 1956

Robert Dekalb Smith

M, b. 17 September 1873, d. 15 May 1891
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Walter Scott Smith

M, b. 20 July 1875, d. 6 July 1944
  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2012
  • (Child) Birth*: 20 July 1875; Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 15 September 1903; Bride=Catherine Mae Bell
  • (Deceased) Death*: 6 July 1944; Birmingham, Jefferson Co., Alabama
  • Biography*: According to the Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Walter "received his education in the common schools of Lineville; attended the Lineville college, from which he was graduated A.B., in 1896, and was graduated LL.B., in 1898; entered the school of comparative jurisprudence and diplomacy at Columbian university in the fall of 1898, and graduated LL.M. in 1899, and with the degree of doctor of civil law in 1900. He was admitted to the bar in 1899 at Washington city and returned to practice in his native state. He was elected to the State senate, November, 1902 [34th District, representing Cleburne, Clay and Coosa Counties], and to the house of representatives the following year. He was a a Mason; and a Knight of Pythias."
  • Biography: Written by Joel Campbell Dubose     
    Tuesday, 28 September 2010 00:00

    WALTER SCOTT SMITH
    BIOGRAPHY and GENEALOGY
    (1875-aft. 1904)
    Clay County, Alabama
    Walter Scott Smith, one of the most learned and talented young lawyers in Alabama, and State senator from the Thirty-fourth senatorial district, was born in Lineville, Clay county, Ala., July 20, 1875. He entered Lineville Academy at an early age, and later Lineville College, alternating in his work between the schoolroom and his father's store. He early became bookkeeper and at sixteen was junior member of the firm of W. B. Smith & Co. Ten years of his life were spent in the mercantile business, where his pleasant personality, accommodating manners and high integrity won for him success and many friends.
    At Lineville college, where he was graduated with the degree of bachelor of arts in 1896, he displayed unusual ability, invariably standing at the head of his class. He was awarded the medals for first honor, excellence in English, and best essays, and was especially proficient in the study of the English language and literature, Latin, Greek, French, German, history, economics and mathematics. He always delighted in "forensic fisticuffs" and was prominent in the work of the debating society, always representing his class in the oratorical contests on commencement occasions.
    After completing his college course, he began, in September, 1896, a course in law in the Columbian university law school, at Washington, D. C., where he was under the instruction of some of the most eminent educators and jurists in this country, including Justices Harlan and Brewer, of the United States supreme court. In 1898 he was graduated from this institution with the degree of bachelor of laws.
    In the following year, after a course in the school of comparative jurisprudence and diplomacy of Columbian university, he was graduated with the degree of master of laws, and in 1900, for actual work done, he was awarded the degree of doctor of civil law. At the same time he took a course in American and European diplomacy. He soon established a reputation in Washington as an orator and debater, and upon graduation was styled by the historian of his class "the orator of the South."
    In 1898, as representative of his class, he won the first debaters' prize in competition with men who had received their college training at Yale and Princeton, taking the affirmative side of the question: "Resolved, That a Federal income tax is desirable." In 1899 he was one of Columbian university's representatives in an intercollegiate debate with Georgetown university, before an audience of 5,000 people, and his speech was commended as the best delivered on that occasion. In 1900 he was awarded a set of "American and English Encyclopedia of Law" in a competitive contest for the best thesis on the subject: "State Supervision of Corporations." Having made an exhaustive study of the question of trusts and monopolies, this same year he wrote a thesis upon his graduation on the subject: "Industrial Trusts and Monopolies." He was admitted to the bar of the supreme court of the District of Columbia in 1899, but did not enter actively upon the practice of his profession until the completion of his law course, when he returned to his native county, where he was also admitted to the Alabama bar and where he has since practiced law.
    Being thoroughly grounded in the law, and possessed of an unusual talent for oratory, his determination and pluck won for him the confidence and esteem of the people throughout his section of the State. He made his first political speech in the campaign of 1896, when less than twenty-one years old, and afterward stumped his county for the Democratic party at every election. In 1902 he was elected to the Alabama senate from the thirty-fourth senatorial district, composed of Cleburne, Clay and Coosa counties.
    In the senate he served as a member of the committees on judiciary, education, local legislation and commerce and common carriers. Although one of the youngest members ever elected to that body, he soon won the confidence and respect of his fellow senators, took an active part in legislation, and was regarded as one of the strong young men of the senate.
    On April 11, 1904, he was a candidate for Congress to succeed the late Charles W. Thompson, but it was urged that he was too young to go to Congress, that he could afford to wait, and the argument had its force and effect.
    Mr. Smith was a member of the Baptist church and takes an active but unostentatious part in church and Sunday school work. He assisted in organizing and for two years was president of the Baptist Young People's Union of his church. He was a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. On Sept. 16, 1903, he married, in the Baptist church at Lineville, Carrie Mae Bell, daughter of James A. and Arabella (Parker) Bell, of Lineville. Mrs. Smith comes from one of the best families in the State, and her father was an ex-tax collector of Clay county. Her paternal grandfather, Capt. John T. Bell, C. S. A., was killed while gallantly leading a charge at Frazer's Farm during the Seven Days' fight around Richmond.
    Senator Smith was descended from ancestors who fought in the Revolution, and his father and paternal and maternal grandfathers were Confederate soldiers. His father, Woodie B. Smith, son of Washington S. Smith and Emily R. (Humphreys) Smith, was born in Chambers county, Ala., and was for years a leading resident of Clay county, where he was engaged in farming and merchandising. His mother, Sallie Catherine (Griffin) Smith, was the daughter of Robert and Mary Ann (Wise) Griffin, also of Lineville.1
    Walter Scott Smith

Family: Catherine Mae Bell b. 6 Apr 1884, d. 28 Jun 1961

Catherine Mae Bell1

F, b. 6 April 1884, d. 28 June 1961
  • Last Edited: 27 Nov 2012

Family: Walter Scott Smith b. 20 Jul 1875, d. 6 Jul 1944

Citations

  1. [S478] Edith Ann (Barger) Ley e-mail, e-mail address, Jun 2012 - Oct 2013,.

Olin Theodore Smith

M, b. 15 November 1877, d. 4 August 1961
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Linnie Crew b. 21 Apr 1879, d. 4 Mar 1963

Linnie Crew

F, b. 21 April 1879, d. 4 March 1963
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Olin Theodore Smith b. 15 Nov 1877, d. 4 Aug 1961

James Arthur Smith

M, b. 10 October 1879, d. May 1941
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Mae Hinds b. 1885, d. 1959

Mae Hinds

F, b. 1885, d. 1959
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: James Arthur Smith b. 10 Oct 1879, d. May 1941

Wilbur Young Smith

M, b. 10 July 1881, d. 12 August 1958
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Maude Lee Hobbs b. c 1890, d. 1969

Maude Lee Hobbs

F, b. circa 1890, d. 1969
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: Wilbur Young Smith b. 10 Jul 1881, d. 12 Aug 1958

Carl Cleveland Smith

M, b. 5 August 1886, d. 12 September 1918
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Earl Grady Smith

M, b. 10 January 1889, d. 22 September 1981
  • Last Edited: 19 Mar 2009

Family: Grace McCain b. 1899, d. 12 Nov 1980

Citations

  1. [S47] Lewis W. Griffin Jr., e-mail address.
    courtesy of Earl Grady Smith.

Grace McCain

F, b. 1899, d. 12 November 1980
  • Last Edited: 16 Jul 2001

Family: Earl Grady Smith b. 10 Jan 1889, d. 22 Sep 1981

Claudia Frances Smith

F, b. 10 January 1884, d. 29 November 1956
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Mae Bell Smith

F, b. 31 August 1904, d. October 1976
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family 1: Harry Eugene McWilliams b. c 1902, d. 7 Sep 1932

Family 2: William Charles Turrentine b. c 1902, d. 25 Aug 1948

Family 3: Clarence Hurlbert Alcock b. c 1902

Harry Eugene McWilliams

M, b. circa 1902, d. 7 September 1932
  • Last Edited: 16 Jul 2001
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1902
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 30 December 1924; Bride=Mae Bell Smith
  • (Deceased) Death*: 7 September 1932

Family: Mae Bell Smith b. 31 Aug 1904, d. Oct 1976

William Charles Turrentine

M, b. circa 1902, d. 25 August 1948
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1902
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 2 November 1935; Bride=Mae Bell Smith
  • (Deceased) Death*: 25 August 1948

Family: Mae Bell Smith b. 31 Aug 1904, d. Oct 1976

Clarence Hurlbert Alcock

M, b. circa 1902
  • Last Edited: 24 Aug 2002
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1902
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 31 August 1950; Bride=Mae Bell Smith

Family: Mae Bell Smith b. 31 Aug 1904, d. Oct 1976

Mary Scott Smith

F, b. 13 June 1909, d. 23 January 1981
  • Last Edited: 6 Oct 2000

Family: William Baker Inman Jr. b. c 1907

William Baker Inman Jr.

M, b. circa 1907
  • Last Edited: 14 Oct 2000
  • (Deceased) Death*:
  • (Child) Birth*: circa 1907
  • (Groom) Marriage*: circa 1930; Bride=Mary Scott Smith

Family: Mary Scott Smith b. 13 Jun 1909, d. 23 Jan 1981

Walter Scott Smith Jr.

M, b. 18 May 1911, d. December 1970
  • Last Edited: 14 Oct 2000

Family: Margaret Shipley b. c 1913